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teako170

HONG KONG 2010 trip

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Ah, Bey is such a nice guy. Loved what he said about Linn, and getting Gordon (another super nice chap) to sign his autograph for Monica. :wink:He comes through for the fans once again!

Bey is awesome. I have to upload me doing the Hung Gar forms with him and his Sifu. Granted, I botched them up very badly, (and trust me, it is one heck of a workout just doing the forms) but it was cool of him to invite us to practice with him. When I have the time, I would love to train in a kung fu style. Problem is, there is a lot of bad kung fu and tai chi out there (as well as bad karate and taekwondo these days).

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DAY TWO

Tuesday, Jan 26. Jesse had flown in the previous night and we ran into him at the hotel buffet breakfast - which we wound up eating every morning. (Good to have a belly full of decent food before heading out.) This time we were a little more settled as we started to get acclimated to our surroundings. I had CC’s cemetery name in Chinese but unfortunately Google pointed me to the wrong location. Thinking yesterday’s location was incorrect, I logged onto the net Monday evening and it showed me a site in Chai Wan (opposite end of HK Isle where we were staying). We took the MTR and grabbed a taxi to the site but as we learned yesterday, nothing in HK is simple ..... wrong cemetery! (Thanks Google maps!!) I tired to get a taxi to take us to the site where we were yesterday but all the cabbie kept saying was, "Kowloon side. This Hong Kong side." Our exchange turned into a clip right out of an Abbott & Costello film in which I kept pointing at the map and making a steering wheel motion. "You (pointing at him) drive (steering wheel motion) us (pointing at us) here (pointing at map). And him repeating back : "Kowloon side. This Hong Kong side." Glad the folks in the back seat were having a good laugh.

Anyhow, after hitting KFC for lunch (hmm, was that really chicken we just ate?) we got back on the train and cabbed it to the site. Cabs are great way to get around btw. They’re quite cheap and everywhere you look. Anyhow, the cabbie drove up several steep hills to the entrance of the cemetery and dropped us off but the main office was nowhere to be found (big surprise there). So off we went, hoofing it for another 20 minutes - up even more hills - to the office. But man-oh-man, what a spectacular view! Right off Junk Bay, the Tseung Kwan O Chinese Permanent Cemetery was hauntingly beautiful. The main office building was rather large and easy to find but once we got there - more problems (yeeeah!!) The office personnel told us that the Chinese name for Chang Cheh was incorrect. Maybe we were missing a character, I dunno. "Foiled once again," I thought to myself as three or four men conversed in Cantonese looking over the computers for what seemed a year and a day.

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Monica overlooking Junk Bay .............................. Chang Cheh / Rest In Peace ........................ Tseung Kwan O

Finally, one of them asked us to follow him and we got on an elevator to the ground floor. Exiting, we rounded a corner and there he was – Chang Cheh! I don’t know about the others but it was a feeling of euphoria - sort of a quest for the Holy Grail - when we finally saw CC’s photo amongst the others. It was beginning to look like this part of the trip would not come to fruition but alas there he was.

Notice the flowers next to his picture? Those were left there by Ti Lung. According to a worker we met, Ti visits every few months and leaves flowers. I’m hoping the photos we left behind are still there the next time he visits. (I'll upload those pix tomorrow).

For those looking to pay their respects:

Tseung Kwan O Chinese Permanent Cemetery

Tseung Kwan O Columbarium

Ground Floor, North Wing

Room #11 - Plot #0024

Tseung Kwan O, Hong Kong

Take the MTR Tseung Kwan O Line and get off at Yau Tong station (Kwun Tong district). From there, best bet is to get a cab for the uphill drive. When you reach the Columbarium (again, its quite large and on the right side of the road) you enter the main lobby. Office is to the right and elevators to the left. Take the elevator to the ground floor (I believe the main entrance is actually on the third floor). Upon exiting the elevator, turn to your left. Room #11 is only several feet away - on the left. Upon entering the room, CC’s photo is on the left side.

We spent about 45 minutes there and then we were off to our next destination .... Shaw Brothers Studio!

Of course, despite having the name (and address!) in Chinese the cab driver was still confused where we were going. We were at a red light on Clear Water Bay Road wondering which direction to proceed when Brian spotted the famous sign out the corner of his eye. We exited quickly and began to snap our photos. Brian did his best to convince the staff to let us in but it was a no go. This site hit Monica the hardest as it was a fantasy of Linn’s to visit the studio and here she was living the dream for him. She had brought a vial of ashes containing some of Linn’s belongings and dumped them on the hallowed ground. She also brought a photo of Linn which we left behind at the scene. We might not have been able to enter the gates but Linn will forever be at Shaw.

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Hanging with Bey Logan ......................... Shaw Studio @ Clear Water Bay .................... Linn Haynes RIP

After Shaws we returned to our hotel to prepare for our next meeting - Bey Logan. Once again, despite having the name and address in Chinese, the cabbie had to ask directions though this time it was a hard spot to find. The Cafe Lavande, a tiny cafe in the Central district, was nestled on a hill where cars could not venture. Bey arrived at the cafe shortly after us and it was like meeting an old friend. He was charming and affable and very pleased to meet us. He spoke of his adventures in HK and those he had worked with over the years. Bey attempted to have Lau Kar Leung come join the party but unfortunately Master Lau was hospitalized with pneumonia. We all hope for a swift and strong recovery.

I brought along a CD of 400+ scanned Southern Screen photos and a copy of HKMN as gifts for the Laus. Immediately, Bey whipped out his phone and called Lau Kar Fei - who happen to live just around the corner! Again, fate was not on our side as Gordon was over in China working but there was still a chance to meet him by week’s end (fingers crossed!) Bey had also brought along some gifts (a huge box of Dragon Dynasty discs) which he handed out and autographed for us. Again, a terrific guy who made some time for us despite his chaotic workload.

DAY THREE

Wednesday, Jan 27. Today was a tourist day. A few us hopped the tram car outside our hotel and ventured further into HK Isle. The tram car was quite a bargain (only 25 cents) and covers the entire island. We mingled amongst the locals at some shops and grabbed a quick bite of lunch before heading back to the Ramada.

Our tour bus picked us up at the hotel around 1PM and we proceeded to Lantau Island where we were dropped off at the Ngong Ping Cable Car lift. This cable car ride is several miles in length and gave us a 360° panoramic view of Lantau Island including Tian Tan Big Buddha, the flora and fauna of North Lantau Country Park, Tung Chung Bay and the Hong Kong International Airport.

Once we arrived the cloud cover, which seemed to have enveloped HK the majority of the time we were there, dispersed to give us some short breaks of sunshine. The first thing we noticed in the distance is the huge Buddha looming over the horizon. Our first stop though was the Ngong Ping Tea House where they gave us a demonstration on the ancient tradition of tea serving.

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Monica & Big Buddha / Lantau Isle ............................ Ngong Ping Cable Car .......................... At the base of the Big Buddah

Next up was the Po Lin Monastery. A huge cauldron of burning incense filled the air as we broke from our tour guide and explored the decorative monastery. About an hour later, we took the bus up to the giant bronze statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha. A most impressive site in photos, this Big Buddha is 10 stories high and made up of 202 individual pieces of bronze. Johnny, our guide, told us while most Buddhas face south, this one faces north (towards Beijing) as a symbolic gesture to the mainland as it was China who helped finance the building of the statue. Japan had offered funds to finance the project but the HK govt. refused their aid.

Tai O Fishing Village was our next stop. Known as the "Venice of the East" it was once the largest inhabited settlement on Lantau Island. The village's stilt houses on the waterfront offer a glimpse into HK's past but as the economy of HK has changed, these types of fishing villages are almost extinct. We wandered aimlessly through the little village and snapped our photos. I soon put away my camera though as I began to truly understand my surroundings. This was no tourist spot. These dilapidated shanties were people's homes and I felt it was an insult to these humble people by taking pictures.

While the rest of our group had gone in one direction, I choose the path less traveled - and got lost. I wound up in someone's house by accident (everything is wide open so its easy to do) and then got accosted by three dogs. Feral dogs and cats roamed freely in the village and this round-eye must have looked like a nice snack to my feline friends. Luckily a fisherman came out of nowhere to my rescue and the dogs fled. Eventually, I met up with Monica and took a quick peek at General Kwan's temple (which was closed) and then had a nice chat with an elderly Chinese man (called himself the Reverend) who spoke broken English.

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Po Lin Monastery on Lantau Isle ........................... Monica and her new friend ......................Tai O Fishing Village / Lantau Isle

Getting back on the tour bus (late) we all headed back to HK Isle. It was our intention to hit the Jumbo Floating Restaurant for dinner but this day (like the others) was exhausting. Instead we opted for a nice meal at Outback (yes, again) in Wan Chai. This was Brian & his wife’s final night in HK and despite some wacky service (think we had 5 different servers??) it was a relaxing way to end the day.

DAY FOUR

Thursday, Jan 28. Today we started out by visiting the HK library in Central. We felt pretty comfortable with the subway system and tram car by now and were less dependent on taxis. We arrived at the library at 11 but they opened up at noon. As we were on a schedule, this normally would have annoyed the crap out of me but now I began to understand Hong Kong. The simplest things, such as getting a note transcribed, ordering a cup of coffee, etc., all seemed to become complicated. Best just to learn how to smile, shrug it off and move forward.

Since the library was closed, we hopped onto the MTR for the offices of IFD. Just a few blocks from the MTR, we entered the Vigor Building - an industrial building in which we really looked like fish out of water. We took the lift to their "heavily fortified" office and was greeted by a woman who must have thought we were all crazy. Jesse eventually got a business card from the woman and we were off again. This time - to the world famous Victoria's Peak!

A trolley car ride, on a very steep incline, took us to the highest point in Hong Kong. At the top was the observatory, a few dozen Westernized shops & restaurants and a huge outdoor area that gave us some breathtaking views (even with the heavy clouds and fog). This was certainly a tourist trap though as we heard languages from all over the world - even some English!

After a few hours of sightseeing (Jesse and I) and shopping (Monica) we headed down the mount to our next destination - the 10,000 Buddhas Monastery in the New Territories. As fate would have it, while walking to the MTR from the Point, I spotted two monks who were happy (well, one was) to take some pix with us. Moving forward... we took the train to the NT and made our way to the monastery. A little rain had fallen and heavy humidity added to the brutal (yes brutal) ascent up the 400 steps. Along the way, Buddhas of all facial expressions lined both sides of the steps. We eventually got to the top and the three of us looked like Balboa the first time he climbed the museum steps in Rocky 1; soaked in sweat and short of breath. Atop the mount was the temple, a restaurant, a large pagoda, incense burning urns, and several workers constructing even more Buddhas. At last count, they had over 13,000! Think it might be time for a name change?

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View from Victoria's Peak ............................ 10,000 Buddhas Monastery. .................... Man them steps are a *bleep*

The place was near closing time and we were the only ones there - other than the workers. We left the temple down another series of steps which were more hazardous than the ones going up. Moisture made the stone steps slick and it was a formidable act to get down them; think Jesse wiped out once. Half way down the descent, Monica was joined by a monkey who came out of the jungle and started walking with her. He seemed friendly enough and I think it was Monica’s intention to pet the damn thing (or maybe try out his monkey fist) but the monkey had other ideas who made an abrupt motion at her letting her know to back off.

We finally got to the bottom and dragged our soaked selves back to the train. My feet had multiple blisters and were swollen. Day over (thank God!)

A side note on the stairs .... the steps in HK (all stairs not just the temple) are much different than what we are use to in the West. They are shorter (in height) and make it awkward to ascend/ descend. We couldn’t figure why our legs were hurting at first but then realized it was the damn steps. I think I tripped over a dozen times. I will continue tomorrow with the final installment....

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Thoughts on Hong Kong

or

Why one lone security guard kept 5 Americans out of what was once South East Asia's largest film studio.

So to start this let me say if you ever decide to take a trip to Hong Kong, please resign yourself to the fact that you will most likely spend 15 to 17 hours getting there by plane. That is, of course, if you leave from the United States. If you've never been trapped in a plane for 15 and a half hours, like myself, then you can't appreciate the expression, "like a bird trapped in a cage." Up to that point I had been on 4 flight to Europe with the longest of those 4 being only 8 hours. After 10 hours of getting up and down I finally decided to remain standing for the rest of the flight.

Once we arrived and made our way through customs, which I should mention was the easiest experience with any countries customs officials I'd ever had, we found the MTR from Hong Kong airport to Hong Kong Island. MTR=subway. Clean and orderly transportation. No trash in the stations and no panhandlers asking for money. The panhandlers are conveniently located outside the MTR station. But they are the least pushy panhandlers I've every encountered. In contrast, in Paris once, I was ganged up on by two old drunk men looking for money. To disperse them, I threw a 10 Franc coin up in the air and ran for my life. But I'm straying from the point.

My wife and I had a day before the rest of the gang showed up in Hong Kong. We spent the day walking the streets. If you want to see how regular people make their way in a big city, just walk the streets and keep your eyes open. I saw two men reduce a large animal to component parts. I couldn't tell you what the animal once was but in little time they had it parted out. I guess when you have a big animal to butcher you need a big room to do it in, in their case they had 15 feet of a sidewalk. After that, we went to the Hong Kong Zoo/Botanical Garden.

Primates

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A flower, gripping isn't it.

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It was free and I saw the world biggest raccoons, at least 3 times larger than any raccoon I'd seen dead on the side of the road or in the woods. Wish I had a picture. After that we took a walk to the Hong Kong Park. Also free. Had a tea museum. I know that sounds dull, but it was really interesting. Called it day after that.

Teako170 and Monica arrived late Sunday night and we met them for breakfast Monday morning. After breakfast we met up with Mike Leeder. Mike has a wealth of information about Hong Kong cinema, past and present, and actually makes a living doing what many of us dream of, working in the Hong Kong film industry.

Mike Leeder

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He willingly offered his time to meet with us and we talked for an hour and half or so. Mike posts from time to time here on the forum and his user name is, oddly enough, Mike Leeder. He had many kind words to say about Linn as he and Linn had collaborated on ideas for extras on DVD releases, among other things.

Me and Mike

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We had hoped that he would be able to go with us to visit the burial site of Fu Sheng and Chang Cheh but unfortunately prior commitments kept him from doing so.

The wife, Mike, myself

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Part 2 tomorrow

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Such great reading, it's really almost like being there, well, you know what I mean.

How exciting that Ti Lung had recently been to visit CC's site, and tale of the monkey walking with Monica, hope she got a picture of that!

Thank you Teako and Magicpoe!

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Why one lone security guard kept 5 Americans out of what was once South East Asia's largest film studio

I still say we should have rushed him. Let the girls take him out and we head to Run Run's for his copy of Tiger Boy! :tongue:

and tale of the monkey walking with Monica, hope she got a picture of that!

Yes, I'll have to post a pic of that.

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Don't let Teako lie to you all....he tripped about a dozen times PER DAY on steps.

The monkey was really cool and I had full intentions of petting him...until he bowed up at me!

I'm still working on getting the video I shot converted to disc so I can download/upload (whatever) for all to view.

Even though we patronized mostly western/american restaurants the food was still not the same as their refrigeration and meats are not the same. However, Starbucks, I am delighted to say, is the same and there seems to be one on every block.

MagicPoe-my monkey was way bigger!

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Before I get to the travelogue, I wanted to post some additional pictures. While many were unable to make this trip, we kept the KFF spirit alive and left these pix at the sites of Fu Sheng (1) (2) and Chang Cheh (1) (2).

And, oh yes, the monkey! Can’t forgot Monica’s new friend from the jungle. :tongue:

DAY FIVE

Friday, Jan 29. If you ever visit HK, make sure someone has a cell phone that works. Oddly, my phone received calls/texts but nothing outgoing and even more oddly, the Chinese never want to make a call for you. Several instances over the week, we had asked but they always responded with "You call." "But no one will understand English if I call," was my response. "Oh they understand English - no problem." Yeah riiiiiiiiiight!

Back to the library - which was open - but the wrong branch! Nope, we needed to go to the branch in Causeway Bay. Once we got there, we had to ask directions a half dozen times. Everyone just points but never does any sign language like how many blocks it is for instance. Anyway, we did arrive and luckily I had everything written in Chinese. We got set up in the archives section where I began my search of the South China Morning Press; July 7, 1983. Recognize the date? Yes, we found several English articles on Fu Sheng’s fatal car wreck. Some new information surrounding that week plus finally some hard journalism to refute/confirm various rumors about this incident.

Was Wong Yue really involved in the accident? Were Fu Sheng and Jenny separated at the time of the accident? And why wasn’t Fu Sheng driving you might wonder? Maybe it had something to do with a little court appearance he had earlier that day. I’ll post my findings in the Fu Sheng thread at later date. If we had the time I would have stayed there all afternoon browsing the SCMP archives but....

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Researching @ the HK Library ..............................Bey Logan, his Sifu and Jesse ...................... Filming the kung fu masters

...We were running late and suppose to me up with Bey at the Star Ferry pier. I attempted to hail a taxi but none were stopping. I spotted one at a red light in a crowded intersection and jumped in but the cabbie freaked out. Apparently, one cannot flag taxis down like in NYC but must go to a taxi stand? I dunno but I got out, the light turned green and before I could get back to the curb the SOB floors it almost hitting me. In typical Nu Yawk style, I punched the top of the cab, he slams on the brakes and jumps out screaming at me in Cantonese. After firing back at him in English, I resolved to yelling at him using my Cantonese: "Bye-bye, Bye-bye, Bye-bye" as I mimicked it with my hand. (Hey, it was one of only three phrases I knew and I sure wasn’t going to say “I love you.”) Oh, yeah it was quite the scene man (haha). As Big Mike said, "Fighting with Red Cabs, a true HK sport unfortunately!" Anyhow, we eventually got another cab and laughed our asses off all the way to the pier.

Pier 7 - home of the Star Ferry. Bey and his Sifu practice here multiple times a week and both Jesse and Monica got to join in and learn some authentic gung fu. Bey’s sifu, Mak Che Kong, was extremely polite to us and gave us his business card. Oh, be sure to check out his website when you have a moment. Again, I want to thank Bey & his Sifu for allowing us to join in with his training. Afterward, we grabbed some lunch at the pier. The Burger Box serves some whopping burgers! I’m sure Tosh is probably squirming in his chair "... KFC..? Outback..? Burgers..? Duuuuuude! What about the dim sum?" Yup, while Brian and Jesse experimented a bit with the local fare, my tummy was sticking with stuff I knew I could hold down.

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41 Cumberland Road Kowloon, HK......................... Teako, Monica, Jesse @ 41 ...................... Bruce Lee’s former home RIP

Back to the MTR we went. We were running out of daylight and scrambling. We had to forgo visiting the HK Film Archives, Betty Ting’s apt where Bruce Lee had died, Jackie Chan’s offices and I failed to call back Big Mike (sorry mate). We did take a quick trip to 41 Cumberland Road though. Hard to believe Bruce Lee’s house was turned into a love motel as the surrounding neighborhood was far from shabby. There were upscale homes behind privacy walls, schools, and temples. We didn’t go inside Bruce’s home so we have no idea where they currently stand on converting it into a museum but there definitely wasn’t any construction activity going on from what we could see.

Hopping onto the MTR, we got off in Kowloon at the waterfront. The Avenue of the Stars gave us phenomenal views of HK Island as we walked the congested tourist spot. We snapped many a photo of all the stars: Ti Lung, LKL, David Chiang, Ivy, Bruce, King Hu, Jackie, etc... A woman approached Monica and Jesse as they were taking a picture of Run Run’s star and asked if we had any idea on who Run Run was. Apparently, we were much too young to know any of these people (ha!) She was rather astonished as they schooled her with their knowledge of the Shaws. While there, we also got our photos taken with the famous Bruce statue which was quite impressive with the waterfront/ cityscape backdrop. It was our intention to hop the Star Ferry and cross back over to HK Isle but we opted for a cab ride. Again, my feet were shot from walking.

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Jesse on the Ave of the Stars ....................... Chillin w/ Bruce's star.............. Bruce’s statue - what an impressive site!

DAY SIX

Saturday, Jan 30.

Bey had left a message that we would finally get our chance to meet Lau Gar Fai. YES! Lunch with the Master Killer himself. Only one problem. He could met us at 12:30 but at that hour we would be several miles up flying somewhere over Northern China on our way home. (....ughhhhhhhhhhhhh!)

And that’s how things go in Hong Kong. You got to roll with the punches and take everything in stride because, as I said, its not a vacation but an adventure!

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Photo by Bey. All rights reserved. No Shaolin monks were harmed in the posting of this picture.

Be sure to check out Bey's Blog on our adventures as well.

Final thoughts.....

Considering we had never been to Hong Kong, I’m very pleased with the amount of activities we squeezed in. Sometimes it was a rush and sometimes we hit a brick wall, but in the end, I feel this adventure was a huge success. When I first started researching this trip 17 months ago, I had little to zero information on the sites of Fu Sheng and Chang Cheh but through persistence, I was able to acquire their locations and track them down. Now we're able to make this data available to fans all over the globe. So please, if in HK, do stop by and pay them a visit. I’m sure they would appreciate knowing their fans hold them in such high regards even after they have parted this world.

If I learned one thing from Hong Kong, it’s you can never do enough planning. I had an itinerary and stack of papers (maps/web info/etc.) in my bag that I took everywhere and yet, sometimes, it still wasn’t enough. We had to learn through error and make adjustments as we went along. So whatever you do, if you go to HK, be well prepared.

Granted this trip was costly and its hard to take such a journey (especially in this economy) so its quite understandable that only a few brave souls could make it. While there’s no plans for a return to HK, it would be great to see someone else step up and spearhead the next HK adventure. The whole purpose of such gatherings is for people to leave the net and interact in person. Seeing something on TV is one thing but nothing like experiencing it in real life. Same goes for the fu. Talking on-line is fun but mixing it up with people live is a whole other story.

I want to thank Monica, Brian & wife, Jesse, Bey and Big Mike for making this trip one of the most memorable I’ve experienced.

Hopefully, we can have the next meet up somewhere stateside; where the price tag won’t be so hefty. I personally don’t have anything on the immediate horizon however I am thinking of a more tropical destination, the Caribbean, in the not-so distant future. Not your typical get-to-gether for talking the fu but I got something in the mix that I hope a few old friends (and some new ones) can join in.

Best, T

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I did have one "authentic" meal...sweet and sour pork with white rice. Not too bad and not too exotic. Magicpoe, when you went to the dim sum place, did you have your own table or were you seated with others who were currently eating?

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Was a pleasure meeting you guys

Sorry i couldnt spend more time with you, would have loved to but been in the middle of a mad shoot, off today then back into it for the next week

Cheers

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So fantastic, what a great piece of writing Teako! :yociexp67:

Seeing the photo's with the beautiful words that you left, really did make me cry, they were very moving, as has been sharing the experience through your words. I look forward to reading your findings about the accident, (can't believe you found something, bravo) and may I also add, my sincere appreciation for all the hard work you put into the trip - research, locations and tracking down the story from that day.

The photo of Monica with the monkey..... priceless.

:khi9l:

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:xd:You beat me to the outback comment Teako, I told you to start practicing that Iron Stomach Kung Fu before you went.

I had the same problem with the cabbies in Shanghai, even with someone that spoke Mandarin and Cantonese!

Great pics, can't wait to see the rest of them.

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Thanks to all of you for sharing this journey with us. I have read everything twice! You could have just said "Hey it was great", but instead you all went that extra mile (blistered feet and all) to give us an in-depth look at the experience. I do feel a bit like you took me on the journey after the fact.

Monica, your leaving the ashes and picture of Linn at the Shaw studios was extremely moving, and I think it was quite a beautiful gesture. I'm glad you went on this journey and it was great to see you smiling and making (tenative) friendships with the wild life!:wink:

Jesse, I absolutely love the pictures of you practicing with Bey and his Sifu, and your accounts of the details of the visit. Way to go!

MagicPoe, your photos, videos, and info is fantastic, and I hope we get to see more.

Teako, thanks for all your hard work, putting this together, your organizing, your incredible written reports of the adventure, and for being a part of making yours and other great people's dream come true (and then sharing it!). Totally cool. I roared with laughter at some of your exploits- jumping turnstyles, fighting with cabbies- so funny. As they say- you can take the man out of New York City, but you can never take the New York City out of the man!:xd:

I hope there are still more pics, videos, and annecdotes to come.

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The pictures looked nice to me. So you guys must have had a wonderful meeting.

I wish I was there too!!

I was wondering how many forum meetings have been held in HK and also in London(?)

before? Normally I go back to my place of birth in October because of the Chung Yeung festival. Paying offers/respects to my late ancestors at their graves. I'm original from a single-surname-lineage-village in New Territories where the Chung Yeung festival means a lot to the villagers. Many fellow villagers will return from overseas for that festival as well.

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Thoughts on Hong Kong

or

Why one lone security guard kept 5 Americans out of what was once South East Asia's largest film studio.

After our meeting with Mike Leeder we boarded the MTR train in search of the burial site of Fu Sheng. Let me start out by saying that teako170 did an outstanding job researching exactly where we needed to go to find the Fu Sheng and Chang Cheh sites. Without his research and planning I think we would have been out of luck all around. I should have told him that face to face when we were in Hong Kong. Thanks for your hard work.

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Looks very much like any subway line doesn't it

Teako170 decided to have fun and shock a few people by jumping back over a turnstile at the MTR station. Apparently they had never seen this before and they looked at us like we were from Mars. Good times. Once that was all sorted though we were on our way. You can check out teako170's post for the specifics on exactly where to get off and the address of the Fung Ying Seen Koon Temple but if you get off at Fanling your practically at the main gate of the Temple. The ducks with the heads, man if we had more time and I had been more hungry........ I settled for a noodle dish with duck. After our meal we headed for the temple.

Let me start out by saying that, for me, visiting Fu Sheng's burial place was probably 80% of the reason I decided to make this trip to Hong Kong. The other 20% being seeing Chang Cheh's place and just to take a trip period. As you enter the gate there are two sets of staircases to climb to get to the temple where one can offer incense and what have you.

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Behind the temple are the buildings you see in the video with the rooms that hold the remains. My assumption is after the body is cremated the ashes are put into a large red envelope and then into the small shelves with the photos on the outside. There were many shelves with envelopes but no photos yet to close up the opening. If I am incorrect in this assumption, please let me know.

Me and my wife

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What makes this so different from cemetaries in the US is that, instead of just a name and birth/death dates, you have a photo of the person who has died along with the relevant personal information. Much more personal experience in that you fully realise that these were once walking/talking humans and here's what they looked like. You can't just dismiss it like a regular cemetary here in the US with plain headstones with names and birth/death dates on them. I found myself walking around looking at these faces, many old, but some quite young. Fu Sheng will always be that young smiling face that we see in the photo and in the movies he made.

Teako170 printed 2 nice photos that he left. One of the ladies who maintains the grounds looked at the photos and I pointed out that the man in the photo was the person in the photo on the wall. She asked, in very broken English, if we came just to visit the site for him. I explained in very simple words yes we did. She smiled and went back to her work. The wedding picture was the one she seemed to look at the longest.

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As we were leaving, teako170 and myself took this photo by the incense pot.

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More soon

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I was wondering how many forum meetings have been held in HK and also in London(?)

before? QUOTE]

That was the first time forum members ever got together in HK. I don't know of any such get togethers in London. But I've got a bunch of friends in the UK who are fu fanatics, so you never know!

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Thanks for that post MagicPoe! Beautiful.

Jesse, I really admire your gung ho attitude, and the fact that you joined right in. A lot of people that haven't tried this themselves, may not realize what a great job you did in keeping up on your first try. I was impressed. There were times when you stayed very close to the forms. Amazing knowing that you were going in cold!:bigsmile: Thanks so much for sharing that. Those guys were very cool to let you join in on the experience. Has it made you ponder doing some training now?

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Thanks for that post MagicPoe! Beautiful.

Jesse, I really admire your gung ho attitude, and the fact that you joined right in. A lot of people that haven't tried this themselves, may not realize what a great job you did in keeping up on your first try. I was impressed. There were times when you stayed very close to the forms. Amazing knowing that you were going in cold!:bigsmile: Thanks so much for sharing that. Those guys were very cool to let you join in on the experience. Has it made you ponder doing some training now?

Bob, thanks for the kind words. It was awesome for Bey to invite me to train with them.

I did mention to him that when I have the time, I would like to study kung fu or tai chi. There is a wing chun school near me (on my way to my job). But as far as good kung fu, as I'm sure you know, you have to find it, as these days there's a lot of bad kung fu (and martial arts) instruction. :squigglemouth:

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..or you can move over to HK and train with Mak Che Kong.

Looks like his lineage is somewhat similar to LKL's.

You know you're getting the real deal when it comes to him. :bigsmile:

Nice video.....

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Jesse that video is awesome! I am so glad it turned out so well.

Guys...Jesse did a total of 3 workouts...and they are brutal on the legs. I did one and was starting to break a sweat but my thighs were feeling it and beginning to shake.

Jesse did great!

Magicpoe & Teako great pics and I love reading it. It helps me get it back in my mind everything we did!

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Those horse stances are a great workout on the legs, something you can easily do at home while watching a KF movie.

Yeah you looked good out there Jesse, it must of been awesome to sit in with a real Kung Fu master.

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