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DrNgor

August 2017 Mutual Movie Review Thread

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Another month of August, another month of "Back to School" sales and promotions and commercials reminding us that our children (and maybe ourselves) have to put the fun days of summer behind them and get back to reality. It's a sad time for children, although secretly they wanted in their heart of hearts to go back to school, because how much longer could they sit in the heat playing vídeo games and watching reruns of "Wings" on USA? Or at least that's how it was for me. I don't know what kids these days spend their days doing...probably goofing off on their Smart Phones and deciding which summer blockbuster they'll go see this week. In my day, we were Lucky if we got two summer blockbusters a year...get off my lawn!

That said, since it's "Back to School" time, I'm taking the Mutual Movie Review Thread back to school. The theme is:

Back to the Dojo For You, Baby!

We shall review movies where the martial arts school is an important, integral part of the storyline. No cameos or throwaway scenes set at a kung fu school here. The movies we choose must be of the sort that they probably wouldn't work if you removed the school from the script. From The Chinese Boxer--the one that kickstarted the modern era of kung fu movies--to films like Ip Man 2, martial arts schools have been the place of training, the place where honor is defended, and, sadly, the place where large scale massacres happened. So let us celebrate this imporant facet of MA movie culture and take things back to the old school, or push forward with the new school!

Observation: In this particular case, I will not include Shaolin and/or Wu Tang Temples in my definition of school.

The rules continue the same:

1. Please try to avoid overlap with reviews. We want to see as much variety as possible!

2. No length requirement for your reviews, but at least 2 paragraphs will be nice.

3.  If you want to make sure no one else takes your choice, please mention beforehand that you'll be reviewing it.

4. Have fun!

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I've been thinking about this theme over the weekend, not sure I have any films that fit this criteria?, which I haven't already reviewed. Might just have to go for the obvious Yip Man 2, which @DrNgor mentioned in his post.

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On 7/29/2017 at 1:50 AM, DrNgor said:

Observation: In this particular case, I will not include Shaolin and/or Wu Tang Temples in my definition of school.

For myself and @DragonClaws, I read this statement to mean - a heap of Dragon Lee flicks are still fair game.:tongueout

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Death Cage (1989)

Aka; Bloodfight 2; Mortal Combat 2: Death Cage

Starring: Robin Shou, Joe Lewis, Steve Tartalia, Mark Long, Kam Seung-Yuk, Wayne Archer, John Ladalski, Toby Russel

Directors: Chan Man-Sam, Robert Tai

Action Director: Robert Tai, Alexander Lo Rei

I don’t really have an intro to this particular piece of work. It’s such a shoddily-plotted time-waster that it’s hard to comment on it beyond its fight scenes. It does, however, occupy an interesting place in director/choreographer Robert Tai’s filmography. By 1989, his Shaw Brothers days were long behind him, and his ninjasploitation era had apexed with Ninja: The Final Duel only a few years earlier. I guess this film was a transition in this Tai’s final period, which saw ever-so scant returns during the 1990s. The last time I’d heard about him was when he teamed up with Chi Kuan-Chun and the Wu Tang Clan to make a wuxia film during the late 90s/early 2000s, although that film never saw distribution. I find it rather odd that one of the genre’s highest-paid choreographers (according to an interview he gave at the now-defunct Kung Fu Cult Cinema website years ago) had practically drifted into obscurity by the late 90s (unless he was a regular on Taiwanese TV).

In the city of Bangkok, there are two very “important” schools, those being the Wai Chai School (whose master is a real sissy) and the Kents School, ran by farang Joe “I beat Chuck Norris” Lewis. During a tournament, a Kents fighter named Lai Chai (Kam Seung-Yuk, who looks like Lam Ching-Ying on steroids) beats the Wai Chai’s top student, See Hom (Robin Shou, of the Mortal Kombat films), by cheating. While working See Hom’s leg over with brass knuckles, his master tries to intervene and gets his leg permanently broken for his troubles. The Wai Chai school is disgraced and closes down, although to be honest, we never had much evidence that the school had any more than three students.

Some months later, See Hom’s master and his worthless adopted daughter is living with him at his car garage, when they are visited by the master’s brother-in-law, Tang Chuan (the Ghost-Faced Killer himself, Mark Long). Tang Chuan decides to pass his wushu and tai chi skills on to See Hom via exercises that involve objects at the car garage. So See Hom is slowly becoming a real kung fu master, while the lack of decent competition for the Kents school means lower betting profits for its owner, Mr. Hunter (Joe Lewis). Thus, a rematch between See Hom and Lai Chai is in the works. And what will happen when See Hom proves to be more than a match for Lai Chai *and* the Kents star fighter (Steve Tartalia)? Then we’ll see just how dirty these farangs are willing to play.

Death Cage is little more than The Karate Kid with a few extra helpings of stage blood for our actors to be doused in and spit up. Beyond that basic premise, not very much in this movie makes any sense. I don’t know how the Wai Chai school could have become so popular when the master is so against fighting that he encourages See Hom to *let* a bunch of random Thai thugs wreck his garage in front of his face. How could a sissy like that run a school capable of producing the only competition worthy of the Kents Gym fighters? Oh, yeah, I remember now: bad writing.

If you were to judge the film on the first three fights or so, you’d wonder how Robert Tai ever reached the exalted position at the Shaw Brothers that he once did. The first fights in the ring, especially those between Robin Shou and Kam Seung-Yuk, who wears a lion’s mane wig and is decked out in leopard print, are rather lackluster. Shou’s punches and kicks are pretty basic, broken up by the occasional drop kick or throw. Still, Shou did better work in the American Mortal Kombat films than he did here. Things pick up a little during his first fight with Tartalia, since the latter is a more dynamic fighter. We didn’t see much of his skills in Once Upon a Time in China (1991), but Tartalia is actually a first-class kicker. His moves are more stylish than Shou’s, who turns out to be a more economical fighter.

The movie picks up in the second half, with several 1-on-2 and 1-vs-many fights. These dwarf those earlier ring fights, and choreographers Lo Rei and Robert Tai feel much less restrained in their choreography. We see Robin Shou take on a bunch of machete-wielding Thai thugs (probably the only Thai people in Thailand we see in this film), with a rhythm that recalls some of Jackie Chan’s better group fights. Shou’s moves are still pretty basic, but the direction itself is solid. Mark Long gets two fights, his main one being against Mr. Hunter’s two bodyguards, a white girl and a black girl (both of whom are blonde, if you care). Those two girls have a lot of acrobatic moves and moving-in-tandem choreography, which is really neat and comes close to representing the high point of the movie.

Later, Mark Long’s daughter, whom we saw practicing baguazhang earlier, takes on the two female bodyguards in a brutal and vicious fight in closed quarters. The movie ends with a rematch between Robin Shou and Steve Tartalia and then a final fight against Joe Lewis. These two fights are set in a bamboo cage adorned with sharpened stakes. By this point, Tartalia’s character has trained in classic kung fu as well (watch for a cameo by the late John Ladalski as one of his teachers), so the two are better matched. Shou gives the best wushu-centric performance of his career in this fight, with lots of traditional handwork and forms being integrated into his kickboxing. Tartalia, while still showing us some great bootwork, backs it up with some more classical kung fu movies as well. It actually becomes less interesting when the legendary Joe Lewis steps in, since he’s obviously over the hill (although he’s still pretty built) and his moves are even less flashier than Shou’s (Lewis does try to make up for it with some bizarre overacting). Things get outrageously violent as characters get impaled in different ways and nobody faints from blood loss, Thai people, where muay thai was invented (or at least popularized), aren’t even worth mentioning.despite the red paint being splashed about. But when these characters die, boy, do they die hard.

So what does this movie teach us? It teaches us that in Thailand, you have your Chinese kung fu schools, your kickboxing schools ran by white people and held afloat financially by gambling, and the actual muay thai schools founded and run by

 

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1 hour ago, ShaOW!linDude said:

Have the vhs of this, but it's been years since I've seen it. Now I want watch it again.

It'd be worth the rewatch for you. There's some good stuff mixed in with the cornier elements.

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Hm...suggestions for people who may not know where to start:

- No Retreat, No Surrender;

- Born Invincible;

- Bruce and the Iron Finger

- Tiger and Crane Fists/Kung Pao

- One-Armed Boxer/Master of the Flying Guillotine

- a whole bunch of early basher films

- Last Hero in China

- Fearless

- those Ip Man movies, I hear they're popular :)

- Goose Boxer

- Challenge of the Masters/The Martial Club

- Lion vs Lion

- The Master (both versions)

- King Boxer (both 5 Fingers of Death and the Meng Fei version)

- Black Belt Jones

- Snake in the Eagle's Shadow

- Magnificent Butcher

Edited by DrNgor

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On 01/08/2017 at 4:41 AM, DrNgor said:

Death Cage (1989)

Aka; Bloodfight 2; Mortal Combat 2: Death Cage

Starring: Robin Shou, Joe Lewis, Steve Tartalia, Mark Long, Kam Seung-Yuk, Wayne Archer, John Ladalski, Toby Russel

Directors: Chan Man-Sam, Robert Tai

Action Director: Robert Tai, Alexander Lo Rei

Strong review as always, I've spent far too long reading about this one over the years. DrNgor, you have a habit of covering at least one movie a month that I want to buy.

Hope to have a review posted next week, just not had the time to watch a movie and do a write-up afterwards. Had a couple of rviews I wanted to do last month, but never got round to those either:doh

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Crystal Fist

Aka Jade Claw

Starring: Billy Chong, Simon Yuen Siu-Tin, Chiu Tit-Who, Addy Sung, Brandy Yuen

Director: Hua Shan

Action Directors: Corey Yuen, Yuen Shun-Yi, Brandy Yuen, Hau Chiu-Sing, Chin Yuet-Sang

Okay, now that I’ve seen this one, plus Kung Fu Zombie, Kung Fu from Beyond the Grave and Sun Dragon, my Billy Chong debt to the Kung Fu Fandom forums is officially repaid. I owe you people nothing…well, that’s not entirely true. I owe a wealth of Korean movie reviews to @One Armed Boxer, but that’s another subject for another time. I’ll figure out how I’ll do that one later on, perhaps in 2018 while I’m waiting for the 2019 Godzilla film to come out.

So according to Clive Gentry III in Jackie Chan: Inside the Dragon, this film stands as the best film to use the so-called Seasonal Formula, even surpassing the two films that inspired it: Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow and The Drunken Master. Having watched as much of these films as I have, I can only state here that I think said remark is a bunch of poppycock. Perhaps I’ve simply seen too many kung fu comedies, and thus a movie *really* has to Wow me to get my attention, but despite some good fights in the last 20 minutes or so, I didn’t find this film much to write home about.

We open with a kung fu fighter (Hau Chiu-Sing, Stroke of Death) getting ambushed by three other fighters, including a deaf boxer (Brandy Yuen of the Yuen Clan) and a bline one (Addy Sung, who helped choreography Chong’s Kung Fu From Beyond the Grave). They’re led by Master Yen (Chu Tit-Wo, Cheung Man’s father in Last Hero in China), and they have a bone to pick with their victim. Apparently, the guy they’re triple teaming, along with his master, fought the three and were the ones responsible for the two crippled guys’ afflictions. Well, Hau Chiu-Sing’s character is murdered, and he leaves behind an orphan son, Ah Wen, who’ll grow up to be Indonesian martial artist Billy Chong.

Ah Wen shows up one day at a martial arts school, looking for work. He initially tries to fake his way into a job as an assistant instructor, but the other two assistants (Dean Shek look-alike David Wu Dai-Wai and the rotund) Lun Ga-Chun call his bluff and get him beat up. The master, however, takes pity on him and is willing to give him room and board and lessons, if he agrees to do all the menial tasks at the school, including assisting the school’s cook (Simon Yuen). Sounds similar to Chin Fu from Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow, doesn’t it?

The relationship between Ah Wen and the cook is initially antagonistic (sound like Drunken Master to you?), but the two begin to warm up to each other. Ah Wen discovers that the cook is actually a master of the Eagle’s Claw and tricks the cook into teaching him kung fu. Things are going well at first, until some random fight with a Russian boxer (Alexander, who played James Bond in Dragon Lives Again) catches the attention of Master Yen (see SITES). Yen and his entourage ambush him and thoroughly humiliate him (see DM), causing him to go back to his master in shame. The cook teaches him a second style, as only the Eagle claw style isn’t enough for Master Yen’s Double Phoenix technique (see SITES, where the Snake Fist isn’t enough for the Eagle’s Claw, but needs to be complimented by the Cat’s Claw). Now Ah Wen is ready for revenge, plus he can get win back his boss’s school in the process—it’s since been taken over by the blind and deaf masters.

As one might expect, there’s not much original in this film and it follows all the expected beats of its predecessors to a T. That alone is enough to put this below Jackie Chan’s Seasonal Films in terms of quality, Billy Chong’s fighting skills notwithstanding. If we look at the better examples of the post-Drunken Master kung fu comedies, like Daggers 8 and Hell’s Wind Staff, those all had a little something to set them apart. Moreover, those films also had the good sense to spread the fight action evenly among their 90-minute run-times, as opposed to this one, where it doesn’t get real until the last 20 minutes. When I saw Daggers 8 back in 2010, I think it officially marked the moment that I got tired of these late 70s/early 80s kung fu comedies. But now, after watching sub-par movies like this and Drunken Master, Slippery Snake, I appreciate it a lot more.

The action is pretty good, although only the last three fights or so are really worth it. It’s basically a reunion of the action directors from Dragon and Tiger Kids, so you can trust that it will be of fairly high quality. However, lead villain Chu Tit-Wo is really no Hwang Jang Lee, which dampens some of my enthusiasm for the final fight. And if it that weren’t enough, some the action, especially when Billy Chong takes on Addy Sung and Brandy Yuen before the climax, is too undercranked. What I liked most about the action is that the action directors, principally those of the Yuen Clan, were more well-versed in Northern styles, so the Eagle Claw on display is more authentic Ying Jao Pai than the Southern Eagle Claw that we get in a lot of these movies. Generally speaking, Northern Eagle Claw uses all five fingers, whereas the Southern variations, which show up in Taiwanese styles and whatnot, use a three-fingered claw. So I liked that particular detail.

I know this film has a positive reputation among fans, but it just didn’t do it for me. Maybe if I had seen it 15 years earlier, I’d appreciate it more. But these days, these Seasonal Film rip-offs really need to surprise to get a positive reaction from me, and this one brought no surprises whatsoever to the table.

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6 hours ago, DrNgor said:

Crystal Fist

Aka Jade Claw

Starring: Billy Chong, Simon Yuen Siu-Tin, Chiu Tit-Who, Addy Sung, Brandy Yuen

Director: Hua Shan

Action Directors: Corey Yuen, Yuen Shun-Yi, Brandy Yuen, Hau Chiu-Sing, Chin Yuet-Sang

Okay, now that I’ve seen this one, plus Kung Fu Zombie, Kung Fu from Beyond the Grave and Sun Dragon, my Billy Chong debt to the Kung Fu Fandom forums is officially repaid. I owe you people nothing…

Great write-up!!! I've not seen this one. Sounds like one to ff through for any enjoyment to be derived from the fights. But don't write off your Billy Chong debt just yet. You do yourself a disservice if you've not yet seen Super Power or Fistful of Talons. Those are outstanding films for story and choreography. 

Interesting comparison, too. I would never have thought to consider this side by side with movies of the Seasonal Film formula. I liked that.

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On 04/08/2017 at 6:01 PM, ShaOW!linDude said:

Great write-up!!! I've not seen this one. Sounds like one to ff through for any enjoyment to be derived from the fights. But don't write off your Billy Chong debt just yet. You do yourself a disservice if you've not yet seen Super Power or Fistful of Talons. Those are outstanding films for story and choreography. 

Okay, I'll see about those in the new future.

@Writ, @M.H. Boroson and @LuFengLover - Shall you three be joining us this month?

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On 8/5/2017 at 7:01 AM, ShaOW!linDude said:

Sounds like one to ff through for any enjoyment to be derived from the fights.

I hereby serve you with written notice, that you are required to adhere to a quota of no more than 5 instances of "sounds like this is one to ff to the fights" and "I'll check this out if it hits Netflix" per month.

If said quota is breached, you will be required to provide either (a) one mini-review, or (b) one review to relevant months mutual review thread, for each additional usage.

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19 hours ago, One Armed Boxer said:

I hereby serve you with written notice, that you are required to adhere to a quota of no more than 5 instances of "sounds like this is one to ff to the fights" and "I'll check this out if it hits Netflix" per month.

If said quota is breached, you will be required to provide either (a) one mini-review, or (b) one review to relevant months mutual review thread, for each additional usage.

Aw, man. Just 5? Now I have to choose wisely, and we all know how good I am at doing that.

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Hope to have a review of The Magnificent Butcher up and posted by the end of the week, re-watched it last night. Just need to get round to writing up my notes etc.

 

 

 

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On 07/08/2017 at 10:52 PM, LuFengLover said:

I might add to this months thread. I am currently taking a class and starting a new job.  Does Hapkido fit the bill for this @DrNgor?

It sure does!

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The Magnificent Butcher    (1979)

a.k.a N/A

Fight Choreographers- Sammo Hung, Yuen Wo-Ping

Director- Yuen Wo-Ping

Starring- Lee Hoi San, Sammo Hung, Fung Hak-On, Jo Jo Chan, Fan Mei-Shang, China-Kam, Kwan Tak-Hing, Yuen Biao, Wai  Pak, Chung Fat, Lam Ching-Ying.

Plot Synopsis- When Wong Fei Hung's famous student Lam Sai-Wing(Sammo Hung), gets framed for murder by a rival Martial Arts school. He must use his wits and strength to save his life, and clear his name. Aided by his fellow students and the highly intoxicated but helpful Beggar King(Fan Mei-Shang).

"Hand over Butcher Wing, or I'll tear this school apart"

 

A classic Golden Harvest production, featuring the very first collaboration between Sammo Hung and Yuen Wo-Ping. These two titans of Hong Kong cinema, joined forces to create some high calibre Kung Fu action. Sammo Hung is at the peak of his physical talents here, he was born to play the portly, naive, Martial Arts butcher, who was a student of the legendary Wong Fei Hung. Kung Fu comedy was still big in Asia at-this time, and while a lot of the humour might be lost on Western audiences, it's still a great example of this sub-genre. This being a Hong Kong production, means there still some darker elements in the film. Wong Jing was one of the films script writers after all. He collaborated with writer Edward Tang, who went onto script many of Jackie Chan's biggest cinematic hits.

Unlike a lot of Kung Fu actioners of the era, the movie doesn’t start with a fight or demonstrations over the credits. Even the first scuffle isn’t really a scuffle, it’s more of a calligraphy duel/battle of words. Butcher Wing had beaten up an old man up, whom he believed to be a thief. Despite apologizing to the man, he still goes to the head of the local Five Dragons school, Master Ko(Lee Hoi-San), complaining and spinning yarns about what really happened. Naturally this infuriates Ko, who's clearly not a man with much patience to start with. When we first see Ko, he’s practicing his various forms and his deadly Iron Palm technique. Smashing a huge stone block into grit within seconds. His palms glow so red, it would make even Chao Chi-Hao(Lo Lieh) from King Boxer, turn green with envy.

"You seem to have a limp wrist, where’s your strength?"

When an angry Ko arrives at Wong Fei Hung's school in search of Lam Sai-Wing(Butcher Wing), he gets more than he bargained for. The always calm and collective Wong Fei Hung(Kwan Tak-Hing) is sat a table, showing his skills as a calligraphist. What follows is a superb set piece, where Ko tries to stop Wong from writing. Even his powerful and fatal Iron Palm technique isn’t enough to help him get the upper hand. Leaving him humiliated and with even more hate for Lam Sai-Wing. They say action's, speak louder than words, and that’s very true in the case of this sequence. I could write multiple paragraphs about the scene, and still not do it justice.

The late Fung Hak-On is on top form here, as the devious sex crazed son of Master Ko, Ko Tai-Hoi. Could anyone else play this role better?. You might say he's the real villain of the movie. Master Ko is clearly a short tempered and violent man, but he's not portrayed as a leery, two faced murderer. He's often shown to be dragged into situations, through all the lying and scheming his son does. Which is how Lam Sai-Wing gets pulled into defending Ko Tai-Hoi, when he's wildly attacked by Wing's club wielding estranged brother, Sai Kwong(Chiang-Kam). Circumstantial comedy and misunderstandings, are a staple of the late 70's comedy Fu production, this story has plenty of it.

"Watch out for my rear"

Fan Mei-Sheng(The Buddhist Fist) makes for a great chicken starved drunken master/beggar king, he was brought in to replace Simon Yuen. Yuen Wo-Pings dad sadly passed away shortly after production began, so they re-cast the movie, re-starting the production from scratch. The beggar king just happens to fall of the back of a cart, as it passes through the town where this story takes place. It's not long before he's stealing chickens and getting smashed on the local wine. Not to mention wowing people with his expert Kung Fu skills and knowledge. He's a far cry from the local drunks I see fighting over a bottle of cider in the town centre. I really need to find out what kind of wine/vintage these old drunken masters preferred?

When the old master stumbles into the local off license, he just happens to bump into Ko Tai-Hoi and his-dim witted lackey. Bruce Lee movie stuntman/movie regular and genuine tough guy Billy Chan. The pair get humiliated by the old man’s impressive nimble skills. At the same time, the beggar king picks up a section of a broken wine vase, and proceeds to neck, the contents. Taking full advantage of the situation and drinking the wine he couldn’t afford to purchase earlier. The choreography here is comedic, intricate and performed to a high standard. It's clear Fan Mei-Sheng is being doubled at times, but you would expect that, with his age and build. While I'm not 100% certain, I'm sure it's Sammo Hung who doubled him for the kick he gives to Fung Hak On??, when Fung's stood atop the wine shelves. I could be wrong, but it just looked like a Sammo style kick to me.

The next dust up, ups the ante and gets a even more serious. The old master meets the young Butcher Wing, who’s been conned into a fight by Ko Tai-Hoi. The ensuing obligatory tea room throw down is top notch. While it’s played for laughs, there's some really nice hand to hand styles on display. How-ever the best is still to come, in terms of the action. The story does get a little bogged down in the middle of the film, but you are later rewarded with one of the best displays of screen combat, ever put on film.

"Are you threatening me?, I'm not scared of anyone"

When Master Ko and his three top fighters turn up at Wong Fei Hung’s school, looking to break up the dojo sign and deal with Butcher Wing. Their greeted by Wing's fellow students played by Opera/Martial Arts wizard Yuen Biao, and former Shaw Brothers star Wai Pak. What follows is a great example of classic old school action, done Hong Kong style. The campy Fan Man(Lam Ching-Ying) and aggressive Monkey Pole Man(Yuen Miu), are more than a match for the two heroic students. Biao's scuffle with Lam Ching-Ying features some sweet choreography. In one of the many stunning sequences, he manages to lose his jacket all while still fighting on. The highly rhythmic action builds more and more, as the scene plays out. Weapons fans, get treated to some Monkey Staff countered by Wai Pak's tonfa and sword. While this isn’t a weapons heavy feature, it does have some nice displays. With Lam Ching-Ying demonstrating a very high standard of Fan and leg work. It's a great scene, that I rate higher than the finale, but that’s only by a few notches.

Chung Fat(Encounters Of A Spooky Kind) deserves highlighting, as the maniacal and highly strung Crazy Cat. His performance makes Jackie Chan's cats claw in Snake In The Eagles Shadow, look like kid’s stuff. He brings a great physicality to his performance, especially during his encounter with Butcher Wing in the old undertakers building. He springs from one of the dusty old coffins, like a cat on a hot tin roof. A strong comedic fight follows, with Sammo Hung giving a visual nod to Enter The Dragon in the process.

"You've a nerve, robbing in broad day light"

Sammo and Yuen Wo-Ping's style blended really-well together, with a combination of both power and intricacy, seldom seen from other choreographers of the era. For me the best of the action takes place in the movies final thirty minutes. We get treated to two fights in quick succession. A powerful one sided riverboat fight, which must have been handled soley by Sammo?. Quickly followed by the films intense swan song fight, between Butcher Wing and Master Ko. With commentary by the old beggar, who calls some of the moves, just like Sam Seed does in Drunken Master. It's an epic encounter, with both Sammo and Lee Hoi-San giving it their all. This dust up features some great action, especially for fans of animal styles. There's also the fictional Cosmic Palm style, which Ko spent thirty years mastering. According to Bey Logans Magnificent Butcher commentary, Yuen Baio doubled Lee Hoi-San for the moments when his character performs the splits. Magnificent Butcher might just feature one of Lee Hoi-San’s greatest action and Martial Arts performances?.

This picture is not without it's, faults, things feel a little rushed towards the end of the movie, did they really need to include the assault/murder scene?. How-ever there are far more positives than negatives. My review only touches the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the little details Hung and Wo-Ping have put into the movie. At an hour and forty minutes, it’s also ten minutes longer than your average Kung Fu movie run time, despite the deletion of some scenes. Inlcuding a seuence where Butcher Wing trys to patch up the old man he busts up earlier in the movie, before he runs of to Master Ko. There's just a few things I'd like to mention before finishing my ramblings.

Jo Jo Chan(The Phantom Killer) really deserved to have more screen time, but she makes a very strong screen debut here. Veteran actress Tong Ching(Dreadnought), is given little to do other than look pretty, as Chaing Kam's wife. While Chain Kam doesn’t get to show off any shapes, he does show a very unorthodox fighting style, in two scenes. His approach is probably more-closer to how a real street attack, would look. Especially the moment when he attacks Fung Hak-On in an alley way. There’s no flowery moves here, he’s just all out crazed and angry, and it shows in his fighting style. Kwan Tak Hing looks nimble and healthy in his second to last screen appearance. A veteran for countless Wong Fei Hung films, from the early days of Hong Kong cinema. Despite being in his eighties, he’s was still incredibly-  nimble for his age. Performing some impressive four finger push-ups and stretches. If you have yet to see this one, then you should get hold of a copy during your next shopping spree. It’s a must see, for fans of Sammo Hung, Lee Hoi-San and Yuen Wo-Ping.

(Additional information from Bey Logans Magnificent Butcher audio commentary, and the HKMDB)

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I forgot to include this in the above post.

Watched the movie?, get the shirt, 36 Styles have created a great Magnificent Butcher inspired t-shirt design. Available in a variety of styles and colors, for both men and women.

Link- http://www.shaolinchamber36.com/magnificent-butcher-train-hard-tank-top/

 

Below is just one of the many colour options, to choose from.

TrainHard-Red-Big.jpg

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19 hours ago, DragonClaws said:

The Magnificent Butcher    (1979)

a.k.a N/A

Fight Choreographers- Sammo Hung, Yuen Wo-Ping

Director- Yuen Wo-Ping

Great review. I haven't seen this in years, but need to soon. I always loved the Yuen Biao/Lam Chin-Ying fight, with its mix of fan-based shapes and kicks. The "Martial Artist's Guide to Hong Kong Films" said that it was one of Biao's best fighting moments. And I love the shapes in the final fight, especially how each of the five animals is suitable for one of the five elements that Master Ko uses ("A dragon can control water!").

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@DrNgor, an chance you can keep the dojo open for a few more days?. I had one more Kung Fu School related review to add, which I hope to post Monday or Tuesday. Planned to add the review last week, until the forum went down.

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