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DragonClaws

The Thunder From Down Under (Richard Norton Appreciation Thread)

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Richard Norton was born on the 6th of January 1950, in Victoria Australia. Raised in Croydon(Australia), Norton became a keen follower of the Martial Arts from a young age. At seventeen he was already a Black Belt in Karate. His skill as a Martial Artist led him to work as a bouncer in nightclubs. While also being the chief instructor at mutltiple Martial Arts school. He eventually broke into the entertianment business, as a bodyguard to the stars. His first job was work with the Rolling Stones during their tour of his home country. Norton would go on to work with bands/artists such as ABBA, Rod Stewart, David Bowie and Fleetwood Mac, to name a few. One of his clients singer Linda Ronstadt, invited him to come to Carlifornia. While in the states he formed a friendship with American martial arts icon and movie star Chuck Norris. This would lead to him landing a role as the ninja Kylo, in the Octagon(1980). A part playing one of the heroes in the movie Force Five(1981), soon followed. This solidified his career/future working in action movies, and T.V from around the world. Norton made his Hong Kong film debut in Twinkle Twinkle Lucky Stars(1985) alongside Sammo Hung, Yuen Biao and Jackie Chan. In 2015 he got a supporting role in George Millers long awaited Mad Max Fury Road. With him currently working on the movie Skywitness(2018), there's no sign of Richard Norton retiring anytime soon.

Trivia

- In the many years he's studied the fighting arts, Norton has pracaticed Thai Boxing, Judo, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and Aikido.

- He and Fellow Martial Artist/bodyguard Bob Jones created the style Zen Do Kai.

- Trained with many Martial Artists including Tadashi Yamshita, Pete Cunningham, The Machado Brothers, Bill Wallace to name a handful.

- Accomplished fight choreogrpaher, recently contributing to the action in Suicide Squad(2016).

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Edited by DragonClaws

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Richard Norton with singer Stevie Nicks.

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With singers Agnetha(Top Picture) and Frida(Bottom Picture) from ABBA.

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Edited by DragonClaws

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5 hours ago, Gaijin84 said:

I've been watching some old King of the Cage MMA events where he was a commentator along with Eddie Bravo, he was quite good.

I've never seen any of those events with him on commentary. Coincidentally last night I was watching a documentary, with him and Cynthia Rothrock, where they both share their opinions on MMA.

 

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As far as I can tell he sat in as a guest commentator for KotC 9, 10 and 11. After that Don "The Dragon" Wilson took back over. Not sure if Don was out on a film shoot or something at the time (June to September 2001).

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22 hours ago, Gaijin84 said:

As far as I can tell he sat in as a guest commentator for KotC 9, 10 and 11. After that Don "The Dragon" Wilson took back over. Not sure if Don was out on a film shoot or something at the time (June to September 2001).

I used to follow a lot of the MMA events until the early noughties. Its become so huge now I don't know most of the fighters or events, except for the really well known ones.

Here's the section from the documentary I posted, where Norton talks about MMA. It in English with German subtitles.

 

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Richard is a guy who's never gotten set in his ways in terms of a martial arts style, he's always been open to new ideas and adding to his skill set. He's a phenomenonal martial artist, and a solid, dependable hand (on and off camera). And from all reports, a nice guy.

Thanks for the thread.

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On 2/1/2017 at 2:40 PM, DragonClaws said:

I used to follow a lot of the MMA events until the early noughties. Its become so huge now I don't know most of the fighters or events, except for the really well known ones.

Here's the section from the documentary I posted, where Norton talks about MMA. It in English with German subtitles.

I both agree and disagree on a few of his points. I think for the most part the fighters in MMA are respectful to each other. There are a few prominent ones that have made a reputation of being disrespectful (Diaz brothers, Sonnen, McGregor), but a lot of it is pre-fight hype and afterwards they are more cordial. I do agree that unfortunately a lot of US fans are looking for a gladiator-like fight with blood and mayhem. In the early days they would boo if the fight ever went to the ground. Japanese fans would be silent for almost the whole match unless a submission or knockout was about to happen. They were much more educated on what was actually happening in the fight.

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On 03/02/2017 at 0:09 PM, Asmo said:

He's a phenomenonal martial arts, and a solid, dependable hand (on and off camera). And from all reports, a nice guy.

I get the impression he's a nice guy from his interviews. He's doesn't appear to have a big ego or edge to him at all.

On 03/02/2017 at 0:09 PM, Asmo said:

Thanks for the thread.

No problem, feel free to add anything to this thread, its for everyone on the forum. Hope to be adding more stuff over the coming months.

On 03/02/2017 at 3:18 PM, Gaijin84 said:

I do agree that unfortunately a lot of US fans are looking for a gladiator-like fight with blood and mayhem

Have to say I preffered MMA when it was different styles going up against each other. Now its become its own style, with competitors today being trained in the MMA style. Something that wouldnt havent happened in the early events. Recall Dan Seven saying in an interview, that they often didn't even know who else would be on the card.

Edited by DragonClaws

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On 2/5/2017 at 1:16 PM, DragonClaws said:

Have to say I preffered MMA when it different styles going up against each other. Now its become its own style, with competitors today being trained in the MMA style. Something that wouldnt havent happened in the early events. Recall Dan Seven saying in an interview, that they often didn't even know who else would be on the card.

Not sure if this is what you mean, but people cross-train much more in different styles. There is no "style" called MMA. The top fighters today are well versed in wrestling and BJJ or Judo (leaning toward BJJ) and have striking training usually with a Muay Thai base that can incorporate knees effectively. A few, like McGregor are strong boxers. You've also had strikers (GSP, Liddell) whose basis came from full-contact karate disciplines, like Kyokushin or Kempo. Admittedly, the days of a strict style vs style with no outside influences is long gone, but this is because it proved pretty ineffective when it ran into something the practitioner hadn't seen before.

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23 hours ago, Gaijin84 said:

Not sure if this is what you mean, but people cross-train much more in different styles. There is no "style" called MMA. The top fighters today are well versed in wrestling and BJJ or Judo (leaning toward BJJ) and have striking training usually with a Muay Thai base that can incorporate knees effectively. A few, like McGregor are strong boxers. You've also had strikers (GSP, Liddell) whose basis came from full-contact karate disciplines, like Kyokushin or Kempo. Admittedly, the days of a strict style vs style with no outside influences is long gone, but this is because it proved pretty ineffective when it ran into something the practitioner hadn't seen before.

In my eyes it has become its own thing seperate to other Martial Arts disiplines. I've seen courses advertised for people to become MMA trainers. Local schools offer MMA training, to me that shows its become its own style. Before the UFC etc got very big, you never used to see the words MMA in magazines/media or on dojo walls. Royce Gracie's Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu did pretty well, against the styles that it hadnt been up against before. These are just my views, I'm by no means an expert on the subject.

 

Edited by DragonClaws

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8 hours ago, DragonClaws said:

In my eyes it has become its own thing seperate to other Martial Arts disiplines. I've seen courses advertised for peple to become MMA trainers. Local schools offer MMA training, to me that shows its become its own style. Before the UFC etc got very big, you never used to see the words MMA in magazines/media or on dojo walls. Royce Gracie's Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu did pretty well, against the styles that it hadnt been up against before. These are just my views, I'm by no means an expert on the subject.

 

I see what you're saying, but if someone goes into a school that offers "MMA" training, they're not learning a new style, they are learning different applications of existing martial arts. No one has invented a new style per se, they have taken the parts of existing styles that have proven most effective in the MMA environment and rule set. "MMA" as a term is more of a marketing tool now because that is what people recognize and it can get them in the door of the school.

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Thanks! Just finishing it up right now, for this interview we focus on Mission Terminate, Norton battles Bruce Le and Dick Wei and Equalizer 2000 its Richard, the bombastic and boobtastic Corrine Wahl, a BFG vs a pre Terminator 2 Robert Patrick! will post the link when its up

 

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Norton with former Wrestler, actor and host of Broken Skull Challenge, Steve Austin.

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Richard Norton worked with Austin on the movie Condemmed(2007), working on the fight choreography.

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scarlett-johansson-ghost-in-the-shell.jp

Richard Norton had this to say about working with actress Scarlett Johansson, on the set of Ghost In A Shell.

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Thrilled to have been a part of training Scarlett in fight skills for the role of Major in GITS. She was a joy to work with and ended up performing well over 90% of her own fight scenes in the movie. Check out the trailer. It looks fantastic.

Link- https://www.facebook.com/RichardNortonFanPage/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE&fref=nf

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