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RogueWarrior

RIP Lau Kar Leung (1936-2013)

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What movies are you guys watching tonight in tribute? I'm starting with Drunken Master II tonight!!!
I will start with Mad Monkey Kung Fu and New Kids In Town

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HONG KONG – Martial artist, action choreographer and film director Lau Kar-leung died on Tuesday morning following a two-decade battle with cancer. He was 76.

Lau, a fourth-generation direct disciple of martial arts legend Wong Fei-Hung and a lifelong practitioner of the Hung Kuen discipline, was most famous for his directorial efforts The 36th Chamber of Shaolin (1978), starring Kill Bill’s Gordon Liu, and Drunken Master II with Jackie Chan, which also won him the Best Action Choreography Award at the Hong Kong Film Awards in 1994.

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Lau began his career in film in 1950 as an extra and stuntman in the popular Wong Fei-Hung movies. He then joined Shaw Brothers Studio in the 1960s, forming Lau’s Stunt Team, and became one of the studio’s principal action choreographers. He was particularly renowned for his collaboration with director Chang Cheh during that time on films such as The One-Armed Swordsman (1967) and The Boxer From Shantung (1972).

In 1975, Lau made his directorial debut, The Spiritual Boxer, for Shaw Brothers. He was the first action choreographer to have transitioned to directing. The film proved a hit and was the seventh-highest-grossing movie of the year in Hong Kong.

Lau’s directing work was characterized by a strict adherence to the principles of martial arts. He continued his work as action choreographer and director until 1994, when he made Drunken Master II and III and was diagnosed with lymphoma. He survived the disease and made a directorial comeback in 2003 with Drunken Monkey, which he starred in along with his martial arts protégé Liu. In 2007, at the age of 70, he served as action choreographer and in a supporting role in Tsui Hark’s Seven Swords.

Lau was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Hong Kong Film Awards in 2010 for his contribution to the martial arts film genre.

He is survived by his wife, former actress and solicitor Mary Jean Reimer, and their two daughters.

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He was, and will always be many things to me. He is my favorite martial artist/kung fu movie star/director/action choreographer. And now he's... gone. I had always hoped to meet him, more than anyone else. I wanted to shake his hand and tell him how much he means to me and my friends. I learned to use the three-section staff by watching him use it. Whenever I want to show someone "real kung fu", I would show them footage of Lau Sifu. I'm devastated.

Lau Kar-Leung (Liu Chia Liang) was a true martial artist, and he spread the art of kung fu throughout the world with his films. Not only did he show how exciting and amazing kung fu is, but he taught us about brotherhood, honor, and compassion as well. There will never be another that can fill his shoes.

Rest in peace Sifu.

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Terribly sad news. I wish his family the best in this time of sadness.

While it's terrible news...at least he left us with some of the most amazing movies with unparralled choregraphy that we can all enjoy time and time again.

So what to watch tonight???

Mad Monkey Kung Fu for starters!!!

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R.I.P.

His legacy in the industry is unparralled. At a time when people in the industry were either copying Bruce Lee's moves or throwing straight karate chops, Master Lau was bringing us real authentic kung fu.

I'm gonna watch him spar against Sammo in pedicab driver.

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:sad:

I still have a lot of his movies to see but to me he's what the old guard(Jackie, Jet, Sammo, Donnie etc) should aspire to be, letting the youth shine as they step back and deliver a few blistering scenes. "Pops" has really impressed me and wish we saw more of him in front of the camera. You will be missed!

RIP

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Damn it all...

RIP Lau Kar Leung

Thanks for your hard work and dedication to the martial arts and martial arts filmmaking. A true professional and an inspiration. We will never forget...

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...gutted by this news.

We are witness to the passing of a legend.

No man will surpass what he has given to the martial world and our beloved genre.

I will be emailing his wife and convey condolences to her and their daughters on the forum's behalf.

Rest In Peace 劉家良

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my condolences also to forum member perigaten at the loss of your si-tai-gung

Thank you PJr. So sad about this. Meeting him one day seemed a genuine possibility for me, well.......... you know he was even in England just a few years ago, around 2007...

Anyway he is not dead for me, he lives on in everything I have been taught as passed down through my kung fu family, the Lau family. I can't explain how big a part of my life this man is. I'm talking daily studying his teachings, at a peak up to 6 hours a day, not one single day passes without me focusing on his hung kuen teachings, & I've barely even begun to scratch the surface of his breadth of knowledge... This just makes me even more determined to live up to the standard he set. One of the biggest influences of my entire life & I'm sad I'll never get a chance to thank him, but I'm lucky that I've had the opportunity to learn & hopefully eventually propagate his genuine kung fu legacy. LKL lives for real.

This is my kung fu family & LKL's legacy for me:

Lau1.jpg

My Sifu, my Sihing (elder kung fu brother), My Sigung (teacher's teacher) & head of my kung fu family my Great Grandmaster Lau Kar Leung.

Lau2.jpg

My Sifu & LKL, bai see...

As long as I'm alive, he's alive for me. I'm only just starting to get to know what he was really about, this will never stop. Lau Kar Leung. THE GREATEST.

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Not sure where the funeral service will be held but his ashes are to be interred at Po Fook Hill cemetary. It's also known as 'Bo Fu Shan Kwat Fui Ham'. Its located in Sha Tin in the New Territories below the Monastery of Ten Thousand Buddhas. We stopped in their briefly (by accident) when we were looking for the 10000.

If you're ever planning to visit HK, Po Fook is easy to get to. Take the MTR East Rail line to Sha Tin Station and you're just a few minutes walking distance away.

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Kung fu fighter and filmmaker Lau Kar-leung loses last battle

Wednesday, 26 June, 2013, 12:00am

News›Hong Kong

CULTURE

Amy Nip amy.nip@scmp.com

The film world was in mourning last night after kung fu master and filmmaker Lau Kar-leung died yesterday at the age of 76.

It followed a two-decade struggle with lymphatic cancer which had left Lau in a coma since Monday.

His second wife, actress Mary Jean Reimer, and their two daughters, were with him when he died at Union Hospital in Tai Wai in the morning.

Reimer, 49, wrote on her Facebook page: "He passed away peacefully and went to heaven in my embrace. Many friends, children, brothers and children of cousins witnessed his last moments … I'm heartbroken and crying, with tears of blood. I don't dare to look back at the memories. I'm in pain!"

The hospital's consultant respiratory physician, Dr Thomas Li Sing-tao, said he suffered from respiratory failure as a result of pneumonia.

Reimer and her daughters will move into a Buddhist nunnery today to mourn her husband.

Actor Nat Chan Pak-cheung, who will organise the funeral, said: "He was tough, open-minded and energetic. He lived a life without regrets and didn't have any unfulfilled wishes."

Lau worked his way up from stuntman to movie director. He was leader of the "Lau Brothers", a family of martial arts practitioners that defined the city's film industry in the 1960s.

His father learned from Lam Sai-wing, a disciple of legendary kung fu master Wong Fei-hung.

In 2010, he received a lifetime achievement award from the Hong Kong Film Awards, acknowledging his excellence in works such as kung-fu-themed Men From the Monastery and Jackie Chan's Drunken Master II.

His battle with illness began back in 1994, when he was diagnosed with lymphoma, said Lau's long-time doctor Tony Mok Shu-kam.

"After he joined the production of Seven Swords [in 2005 as an actor and action director] he suffered from pneumonia and water in the lungs," Mok said. "There were rumours that he could die … He never told me about going to Tianshan [in Xinjiang ] for filming. If he had, I would never have allowed it."

A Buddhist ritual will be held at a Hung Hom funeral parlour before Lau's cremation, and his ashes will be interred in Pok Fook Hill Cemetery, Chan said.

http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/article/1268864/kung-fu-fighter-and-filmmaker-lau-kar-leung-loses-last-battle

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Not sure where the funeral service will be held but his ashes are to be interred at Po Fook Hill cemetary. It's also known as 'Bo Fu Shan Kwat Fui Ham'. Its located in Sha Tin in the New Territories below the Monastery of Ten Thousand Buddhas. We stopped in their briefly (by accident) when we were looking for the 10000.

If you're ever planning to visit HK, Po Fook is easy to get to. Take the MTR East Rail line to Sha Tin Station and you're just a few minutes walking distance away.

I have been there,its a beautiful place! I went there some years ago to pay my respects to Lau Jaam ,father of LKL.

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