Jump to content

I would like to thank everyone who was able to make a donation for the purpose of obtaining new features for the forum. The donation goal was met rather quickly and we here at Kung Fu Fandom can not thank you enough for the support. The plan is once the new site is up and running, the focus will then turn to the forum on updating and adding these new features and we will continue to strive to make your time spent here on the forum as enjoyable as possible. _/|\_

Sign in to follow this  
Guest the dirty tiger

Wu Tang claptrap

Recommended Posts

Guest Chen Zhen

come on ppl, commercial music in general is just trash, with few exceptions, and that goes for ALL genres. just like hiphpo, if u wanna listen to the good stuff, u gotta dig a lil deeper, cuz as previously mentioned, A&Rs do NOT care about whats good...just about whats trendy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest TheManInWhite

"A&Rs do NOT care about whats good...just about whats trendy."

Here's something to chew on:

"First of all, who's your A&R,

A mountain climber playing an electric guitar,

But he don't know the meaning of dope,

When he's looking for a suit & tie rap that's cleaner than a bar of soap..."

Quite clever IMO... :lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Chinatown Kid

:lol We all know what to send you for Christmas now Mark, Snoop Doggy Dog, Eminem and Old Dirty Bastard CDs. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Isfahani

I love it when fans of one kind of music think you don't know anything about what they're into when you say you don't like it... Thank goodness I know too many people that DON'T fit the stereotype and are just as conversant with Eastern Classical as they are with Western Pop idioms, or Japanese Noise, or Rap & Hip Hop. I am, however, flat out prejudiced when it comes to COMMERCIALIZED music tho,

where Country and Rap currently sit next to each other.

Oh yeah - And the dread New Age!

For the record, I loooooove Rap and Hip Hop, but not the negativity that is sometimes expressed in it. It sure ain't like the 80's anymore.

Some of y'all are demonstrating the finest in civil debate skillz, while others... well, one other... lost before they hit the 'add reply' button

lolz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Markgway
We all know what to send you for Christmas now Mark, Snoop Doggy Dog, Eminem and Old Dirty Bastard CDs.

I need a new set of coasters. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Markgway

I managed to withstand a full 50 secs of that Wu Tang crap before my ears started to bleed...

Let's see: in well under a minute they managed to use the words COCAINE, *NIGGIR, *FOCK, GUNS. (Words altered to bypass stupid forum censorship lest you think I can't spell)

Nope, no stereotypes there then. I fart better lyrics.

And some people think this actually has something to do with old school Kung Fu? Or is a valid promoter of the genre we love? Yeah, right.

I guess I must've missed that Wang Yu movie where he played a drug-dealin' pimp from da' hood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Chinatown Kid

Yeah it was called Wang Yu: King of Pimps, and don't forget the followup titled The One Armed Crack Dealer! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Atomic Mystery Monster
lmaoooooo

there's a "blacks are obsessed with martial arts" stereotype??????

hahahahhaha

Believe me, I wish I was kidding about that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Dahnamics

lol most people that have found out about my massive asian film collection were surprised.. where the hell do u live??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Atomic Mystery Monster
where the hell do u live??

America*. It's not a "regional stereotype," it's just not as well known to the general public as the other stereotypes (it's far more prevalent in the entertainment industry). But since you seem to want some examples:

You might want to check out an article called "He wanted to be just like Bruce Lee": African Americans, Kung Fu Theater and Cultural Exchange at the Margins" by Amy Abugo Ongiri. It appeared in Issue 1, Volume 5 of the Journal of Asian American Studies, February 2002. Since I don't have a project MUSE password, I can't read the full thing, but here's a revealing line from the sample text: "This article will explore one example of such an exchange in African Americans' longstanding interest in kung fu films and martial arts."

Here's another article that makes note of "urban audiences" and martial arts movies.

Think about it, why did so many blaxploitation movies have main characters who knew martial arts (Dolemite, Cleopatra Jones, TNT Jackson, etc.)?

Furthermore, why was Chris Tucker in RUSH HOUR? Why were rappers in ROMEO MUST DIE and CRADLE 2 THE GRAVE? Because some Hollywood executives thought that having black performers and martial arts would be irrestible to "urban audiences" (The American entertainment industry's term for blacks). And let's not forget the characters of "Kung Fu Joe" and "Roy Lee" in I'M GONNA GIT YOU SUCKA and KUNG PHOOEY (a movie devoted to deconstructing/mocking stereotypes) respectively.

Let's not forget the existence of a little show called KUNG FAUX that seems to think that redubbing edited martial arts movies to make rap references is funny.

Take a good look at the box copy for most martial arts releases by Xenon, Ground Zero, or VideoAsia. Take a wild guess at what all the misspellings, slang, and rap music name-dropping contained therein is supposed to appeal to. Hell, why did Xenon (allegedly) take out ads for their martial arts line in magazines like Rap Pages, Source, and Vibe?

If you read my "Beat the Bootlegs" thread, you might recall a self-described "urban" comapny called "Pheonix Entertainment Group" that specializes in rap-related videos and martial arts movies.

Oh, and a friend of mine once told me that there was a comedy routine by Don Reed that involved stereotypes and martial arts movies on an album called ROBERT TOWNSEND AND HIS PARTNERS IN CRIME. However, I forget if it was about stereotypes about martial arts movies or the stereotype of "urban audiences" liking martial arts movies. If anyone has heard the album before, please feel free to post about what the routine was actually about.

*Although it might've spread to the UK as well. Did Toby Russell's retitled movies in the Eastern Heroes line (HELL'Z WINDSTAFF anyone?) appear before or after the Wu Tang Clan got popular?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest VonHumboldtFleischer
Furthermore, why was Chris Tucker in RUSH HOUR? Why were rappers in ROMEO MUST DIE and CRADLE 2 THE GRAVE?

Because there is no God.

Oh, and HOS, THUGS AND SKRILLAH out-uglies HELLZ WINDSTAFF by a country mile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Chinatown Kid

Well I know what a thug and ho are but what the hell is a skrillah? Is it the same as killah(killer)? :x

Guess I'm not up on that kind of hip lingo.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest VonHumboldtFleischer

I'm pretty sure skrillah is money, but only because THUGS, HOS AND SKRILLAH is a retitle for BANDITS, PROSITUTES AND SILVER.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Chinatown Kid

Ah, thanks for that info. Never had heard that term used to describe money before....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×