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David Rees

Is Blu-ray Slowly Dying?

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With virtually everything being converted into bluray format these days, it's far from dying. Downloading may be something of an ongoing issue and a growing threat but even that hasn't hugely affected bluray sales. Everyone is not in desperate need of downloading everything that gets released, evident in the "What Are Your Latest DVD/Bluray purchases?" thread.

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The only reason I own a blu ray player is because my son broke the DVD player. I figured 80$ dvd player or 120$ blu ray. I thought the price difference was worth it, just to be able to play both. There are certain movies I will buy on blu ray and certain ones on dvd. I hear people talk picture quality all the time, but for certain movies, I have a hard time justifying the extra money. And, unless the picture quality is night and day, im not double dipping, especially not for kung fu.

I bought season two of Justified on blu ray, only because the price difference was the same, both were on sale 19.99, same for the back to the future trilogy, got it on blu ray for 19.99 (pricing misprint). There are less and less spots for blu ray at certain stores like walmart, and at others like target, it is the other way around.

Also, as for digital media, I will never purchase a product that doesnt sit on a shelf. I often wonder, how they think all digital with stop or slow piracy, It seems to me that it would make it worse. They gotta know that wether it is digitsl or physical, somebody will get it online.

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When Blu Ray initially came out I set about replacing my DVD's, then there was a life defining turn point.

I noticed that HMV wanted £25 for The Getaway. A Steve McQueen movie made in 1973 was twenty five f*ckin quid?:tinysmile_angry2_t::tinysmile_angry2_t:

Net Result: I bought a Media Hub which has tons of space and I download Blu ray rips for fun.

The future is having a media bub or a hard drive. These distributers are a bunch of money grabbing bastards.

If something BIG comes out then maybe but it better impress the hell out of me.

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I refuse to pay for any movie more than five years old. I mean, we all know newer is better, and corporations have been enslaving a race of magical pixies to scan old negatives into pristine digital files for years. I'm a freedom fighter, I tell you.

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Funny story: I actually had to rush out and buy the Alien Anthology on Blu-ray at my local Bestbuy recently. A couple friends hadn't seen Alien, can you believe that? Anyway, it really took me back; doubling back over disorganized shelves, asking staff for help finding the thing, waiting a long time before getting fed up and just poking around until I found it (away from all the other Blu-rays, go figure).

It goes without saying that brick-and-mortar stores continue to strike me as a grossly inefficient use of one's time. The trip wasn't without some nostalgia, however. There is something to visiting a store and browsing around, and I also nabbed Commando on Blu for $7! Though not without gripes, shopping has its own charms. If anyone thinks its going anywhere soon, I'd say you spend too much time on the internet. :wink:

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Yesterday i went into 2 local HMV stores in Portsmouth, my nearest town looking for Blu ray bargains and was shocked to see very little shelf space given to the format, 80% was still DVD.

As i do most of my disc shopping online, is this the case for most people, is this the reason for such little prominence given to the HD format in UK stores.

Or is it younger people just don't buy into disc formats anymore and are content with downloads?

Is it just big movie fans like us that are into HD and it will always be that way?

I await your responses with interest.

I'm inclined to support this statement due to a similar situation I encountered a few weeks ago.I was creating some blu ray channels for the digital cinema projector at work but realised that our film society group had taken all the blu ray discs away for logging.I quickly rushed to the nearest HMV store at the Trocadero Leicester Sq / Piccadilly but to my dismay found only a wee amount of titles on display though 20 times more dvds on the shelves.Alarm bells started ringing because it was almost the same situation with the begining of the end of Laser Discs.

Well I just assumed that HMV was just waiting to re-stock but then I noticed that even the remaining blu-ray discs were sold as a double disc with a dvd of the same film.But the interesting thing was the blu rays were on sale and were even cheaper than the stand alone dvds.I was shocked to see a blu ray / dvd combi of Jaden Smith's Karate Kid selling for £ 3.00 no kidding!!!!

On the way back I entered FOPP Shaftesbury Avenue a subsidiary of HMV which very alarmingly had even lesser blu ray stock; then it dawned.I was concerned and actually wanted to post this here and I'm glad David Rees has done it

You see Blu-ray had a very slow and traumatic start.Dvds were doing superbly well,Sony and Toshiba had to fight it out to win the new format war.Hollywood studios did not fully make up their minds which format to support.There was also a litigation about patent issues between Sony and the Japanese pioneer inventor of the Blu-ray laser and the data protection and encryption system.

While all this was going on HD TVs started hitting the market and dvd manufacturers wisely or unwisely started manufacturing dvd players that can upscale to HD quality.Once users had seen how good their dvds look on their HD TVs, I don't think they were highly motivated to buy new expensive Blu ray players at the time and discard or put aside their huge collection of industry standard authored and pressed dvds paying £25.00 - £35.00 for blu rays of the same titles when technically the main advantage between the formats is sound which hardly makes much of a difference to many users.

Also there are many other ways of viewing HD digital content which have already been mentioned and it is true that the dvd shelves are growing and that it is doubtful whether the majority of dvd releases will see the light of day on blu ray; therefore based on these facts I am inclined to support David Rees' concern till further notice.

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In a way, the industry did a Sega. Blu-Rays are to DVDs as 32X/Sega CD games are to Genesis games. They're supposedly "way better" but in reality most are just shovelware ie. no real improvement. One reason why BR took off in the first place is because a lot of young people hadn't fully invested in DVD yet. Now saturation has set hold.

Now the industry just did it again with 3D. This time, too many people already invested in non3D technology and most technophiles are too far in debt due to the recession. Therefore, 3D is to BR and DVD as the Saturn was to the 32X and Genesis. An improvement which alienated the fan base and was the beginning of the end because too many people were like "WTF?!? I just bought a 32X/Sega CD kit and you release this right afterwards?!?!"

As for physical stores, I go to local shops because the staff knows where is what and what's in stock. Not to mention, most still have a dedicated kung fu section if they're not an Asian market in the first place. Plus, a lot of OOP stuff pops up there, sometimes still wrapped, and it's good to support the local economy.

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In a way, the industry did a Sega. Blu-Rays are to DVDs as 32X/Sega CD games are to Genesis games. They're supposedly "way better" but in reality most are just shovelware ie. no real improvement. One reason why BR took off in the first place is because a lot of young people hadn't fully invested in DVD yet. Now saturation has set hold.

Now the industry just did it again with 3D. This time, too many people already invested in non3D technology and most technophiles are too far in debt due to the recession. Therefore, 3D is to BR and DVD as the Saturn was to the 32X and Genesis. An improvement which alienated the fan base and was the beginning of the end because too many people were like "WTF?!? I just bought a 32X/Sega CD kit and you release this right afterwards?!?!"

As for physical stores, I go to local shops because the staff knows where is what and what's in stock. Not to mention, most still have a dedicated kung fu section if they're not an Asian market in the first place. Plus, a lot of OOP stuff pops up there, sometimes still wrapped, and it's good to support the local economy.

Well put.Other issues were firmware updates which can corrupt hacked multi-region dvd playback on previously modified Blu-ray players.There are other ethenet woes which do not affect dvd players.

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Guest Markgway

Hardly proof of an imminent death. There are thousands more DVDs available than BDs so of course vastly more space will be devoted to DVD. BD is like DVD plus and wasn't intended to wipe out its forerunner (at least not in the short term). Only when the majority of households are HD will we see HD formats (including HDTV) takeover.I see no reason to panic. I mean, look at the line up of BDs due this year alone: Indiana Jones, Jaws, James Bond, Hitchcock. Does than give the impression of a dying format?

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eeeeh, the majority of households ARE HD.... I don't know anyone, or have even heard of anyone who still has an old non HD tv anymore. My grandmother is in a home with Alzheimers, and she has an HD flatscreen, as does the home's rec room.

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Guest Markgway
eeeeh, the majority of households ARE HD.... I don't know anyone, or have even heard of anyone who still has an old non HD tv anymore. My grandmother is in a home with Alzheimers, and she has an HD flatscreen, as does the home's rec room.

I don't think that's the case in the UK. Sure, many people have upgraded to HD televisions (and most of those aren't even full HD), but not so many use them for HD product. It's only in the last couple of years that the analogue signal was switched off here.

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eeeeh, the majority of households ARE HD.... I don't know anyone, or have even heard of anyone who still has an old non HD tv anymore. My grandmother is in a home with Alzheimers, and she has an HD flatscreen, as does the home's rec room.

You are looking at someone who still watches SD TV on those old bulky ugly crt tube TVs.

They are the best for life-like images nothing can touch them (try calibrating an HD TV) and the good brand ones are almost indestructible they go on an on.As long as crt tube tvs exist on planet earth I'll never buy an HD TV.

I was super pissed off ;no major pissed off ! oh whatever..when analogue tv was switched off for this unreliable digital nonsense.At least leave those five channels alone so that come rain, shine, hell or brimstone we can still watch the BBC.

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Hardly proof of an imminent death. There are thousands more DVDs available than BDs so of course vastly more space will be devoted to DVD. BD is like DVD plus and wasn't intended to wipe out its forerunner (at least not in the short term). Only when the majority of households are HD will we see HD formats (including HDTV) takeover.I see no reason to panic. I mean, look at the line up of BDs due this year alone: Indiana Jones, Jaws, James Bond, Hitchcock. Does than give the impression of a dying format?

I think the above is very telling Mark imho. I rarely visit places like HMV but the last time that I went a couple of years ago the situation was reversed with Blu-ray taking up a significant amount of shelf space. Clearly the recession is hitting when the major London branches have completely scaled back in favour of the humble DVD. While there might be a number of big movies coming on BD in '12, 2013 may see a big slowdown with studios putting out less and less releases. It will be interesting to know whether we see a cutback on special features as time goes on too.

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In a way, the industry did a Sega. Blu-Rays are to DVDs as 32X/Sega CD games are to Genesis games. They're supposedly "way better" but in reality most are just shovelware ie. no real improvement. One reason why BR took off in the first place is because a lot of young people hadn't fully invested in DVD yet. Now saturation has set hold.

Now the industry just did it again with 3D. This time, too many people already invested in non3D technology and most technophiles are too far in debt due to the recession. Therefore, 3D is to BR and DVD as the Saturn was to the 32X and Genesis. An improvement which alienated the fan base and was the beginning of the end because too many people were like "WTF?!? I just bought a 32X/Sega CD kit and you release this right afterwards?!?!"

As for physical stores, I go to local shops because the staff knows where is what and what's in stock. Not to mention, most still have a dedicated kung fu section if they're not an Asian market in the first place. Plus, a lot of OOP stuff pops up there, sometimes still wrapped, and it's good to support the local economy.

I would disagree that Blu-rays are generally not a "real" improvement. Though it may be commonly accepted that BDs did not induce the "wow" factor of DVD upon their release, this relates to the diminishing returns of superior fidelity and quality products among consumers that lack quality hardware (e.g. Super Audio CDs, although I'd contend most don't even take advantage of regular ol' CDs anyway). Also, that "young people" mostly did not "fully invest" in DVD is kind of a grand statement, and along with "technophiles" being in debt due to recent recession makes one very curious as to the evidence that indicates such.

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You are looking at someone who still watches SD TV on those old bulky ugly crt tube TVs.

They are the best for life-like images nothing can touch them (try calibrating an HD TV) and the good brand ones are almost indestructible they go on an on.As long as crt tube tvs exist on planet earth I'll never buy an HD TV.

I was super pissed off ;no major pissed off ! oh whatever..when analogue tv was switched off for this unreliable digital nonsense.At least leave those five channels alone so that come rain, shine, hell or brimstone we can still watch the BBC.

Actually, CRT based displays have a number of disadvantages compared to recent technology including but not limited to: geometry issues, sharpness, interference (e.g. Moiré), brightness, heat, weight, and size restrictions on tube televisions, not to mention their impact on the environment (e.g. heavy metals like cadmium). It's funny you mention calibration; back around 2006 I was jonesing for one of the last CRTs on the market and talking to a professional about calibration. He told me CRTs were a personal nightmare to calibrate, what with geometric distortions.

All in all, while CRT had its advantages, flat panel displays have made it much more practical to have larger screens in homes, and together with digital interfaces a lot of the old gripes of the analog era are no longer extant. The only real tradeoff was black point and contrast ratio, but even that's been largely moot since Pioneer put out its Kuro plasmas in 2008 and with Panasonic's recent iterations. About the only people who absolutely needed CRT were pro video editors in broadcasting, and even they have an OLED solution now.

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Actually, CRT based displays have a number of disadvantages compared to recent technology including but not limited to: geometry issues, sharpness, interference (e.g. Moiré), brightness, heat, weight, and size restrictions on tube televisions, not to mention their impact on the environment (e.g. heavy metals like cadmium). It's funny you mention calibration; back around 2006 I was jonesing for one of the last CRTs on the market and talking to a professional about calibration. He told me CRTs were a personal nightmare to calibrate, what with geometric distortions.

All in all, while CRT had its advantages, flat panel displays have made it much more practical to have larger screens in homes, and together with digital interfaces a lot of the old gripes of the analog era are no longer extant. The only real tradeoff was black point and contrast ratio, but even that's been largely moot since Pioneer put out its Kuro plasmas in 2008 and with Panasonic's recent iterations. About the only people who absolutely needed CRT were pro video editors in broadcasting, and even they have an OLED solution now.

Thank you sir but how many people have Kuros?

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By the way the Blu-ray stocks of one of the biggest film producers of the world India, is seriously depleting and Eros Entertainment the biggest distributor in the West of Bollywood product for the past 25 years is hardly pressing any Blu-ray even though they have the rights to the cream.

Indian Blu-rays that once broke the bank are now going for a song.Those who are fans can grab them on eBay.Once OOP that's it.

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This is a great topic, I'm a movie collector myself, and yes I want the best quality I can get from a movie, but if you own a HD TV and have a BR player than your standard DVDs look awesome. Its true a lot of classic movies such as Japanese, Kung-Fu and Westerns don't get BR upgrades only really popular ones do. But I don't see BR dying out, only the prices will drop.

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Guest Yi-Long

I wouldn't trade my 300 euro HD-ready Samsung plasma for any LCD or CRT in the world!

It just looks terrific.

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I wouldn't trade my 300 euro HD-ready Samsung plasma for any LCD or CRT in the world!

It just looks terrific.

Looks can deceive let's wait and see have many 300 euro plasmas you'll have to buy in the next ten years

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Thank you sir but how many people have Kuros?

Oh, the Kuro was just the landmark. Both LCD and plasma based technologies have caught up since 2008. It's not uncommon now to have black levels well below 0.02cd/m^2, which can only be measured by highly specialized spectroradiometers IIRC.

Looks can deceive let's wait and see have many 300 euro plasmas you'll have to buy in the next ten years

Samsung, Sharp, LG, and Panasonic have been claiming 100,000 hour half lives on their models for a few years now. At eight hours per day, you'd have to wait over three decades for this decay to occur.

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Samsung, Sharp, LG, and Panasonic have been claiming 100,000 hour half lives on their models for a few years now. At eight hours per day, you'd have to wait over three decades for this decay to occur.

But at what costs? the repairs and upgrades you'll have to make in those 3 decades might buy a house.

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But at what costs? the repairs and upgrades you'll have to make in those 3 decades might buy a house.

Assuming the repair is under warranty, none. Otherwise, it really depends on the extent of the damage; just as if you fractured the tube of a CRT, a cracked panel basically makes repair impractical. If you take good care of your set, I think it doubtful you'll need to get it serviced in this time span. And what are these "upgrades" you speak of? I mean, it's a TV; maybe if you were really adventurous you could custom install an SDI input or swap out the speakers or something, but they're not really made to upgrade; people do that when they buy a better one.

Maitenance of mortgage proportions probably has a better analog in the automobile.

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I personally have zero interest in blu ray and would be all too happy to see it die off, especially with companies having a nasty habit of occasionally releasing titles ONLY on that format (the unrated director's cut of Conquest of the Planet of the Apes being one). I've got an all region dvd player and a very good vcr and am quite content with that.

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I personally have zero interest in blu ray and would be all too happy to see it die off, especially with companies having a nasty habit of occasionally releasing titles ONLY on that format (the unrated director's cut of Conquest of the Planet of the Apes being one). I've got an all region dvd player and a very good vcr and am quite content with that.

I don't mind Blu Ray co-exisiting with dvd, but yes, it's annoying when they go blu only. Besides Conquest, the other Blu excusive title I want is Gow The Headhunter, which is on a Blu only double bill with The Most Dangerous Game.

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