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What was the last classic martial-arts film you watched?

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Broken Oath (1977) - Like I need an excuse to watch one of my most favorite KF villains (Zhao Cai) being evil, under-handed and breaking hands... really though, this film boasts one of the best stories I've seen in martial arts films (revenge or otherwise.)  I really like that it moves past Lady Snowblood and throws in other nifty subplots (Imperial spies etc.)  The aging make ups on the four baddies are excellent too. 

It's a very addictive film for me because I get so sucked into the world, universe once Jia Lian is an adult and Chan Wai Man is soooooooooooooooooooo great. 

Still bummed that Miss Angela Mao Ying did not have a longer fight against Chan Wai Man though, otherwise the choreography like everything else in this film, is very, very well done. 

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2 hours ago, paimeifist said:

Jeng Cheong-Woh, Lady Jin, Jeng Cheong-Woh.

Why did Shaws have to force this master out?!

 

Xiexie, Paimeifist. He did a brilliant job directing Broken Oath. I'm almost worried to ask how / why the Shaws forced him out?

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28 minutes ago, Lady Jin Szu-Yi said:

Xiexie, Paimeifist. He did a brilliant job directing Broken Oath. I'm almost worried to ask how / why the Shaws forced him out?

I'm not the most knowledgable on this, but I believe he felt his creativity was restricted due to their crazy time restraints and trying to always cash in on what's known to already work/exploitation etc. I may have even heard or read an interview where he implies this. My memory kinda sucks though. :/

I also believe I have read similar about King Hu. 

 

Id love to have some more knowledgable members throw their two cents in on this.

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Spooky Encounters (1980) - What I liked, the younger Brother Tsui and the Kyonsi chasing the police-man (Mr. Vampire priest ha ha!) I respect that Sammo was doing different things here, but the unpleasantness with Cheung's wife and the unnecessary gore weren't my thing (I can roll with gore pretty easily, but I just felt it was off here.)

When it comes to horror / ghost stuff in Hong Kong films, I prefer the emphasis on silly comedy such as Hex After Hex and Fight Among the Supers (Lu Feng was utterly hilarious in this one.)

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This week I revisited:

Snake in the Eagle's Shadow (1978)  - Not a whole lot more I can say about this that countless others haven't said already. Question: Would  a kung fu academy in the Qing Dynasty simultaneously teach Hung Gar (as exemplified by Chiu Chi-Ling, the tailor from Kung Fu Hustle) and Northern Praying Mantis (as exemplified by the school's star student, played by Tino Wong)? Oh, for a better martial performance by Chiu Chi-Ling, watch Kung Fu Master Named Drunk Cat.

 

Two Great Cavaliers (1978) - This Taiwanese costumer has John Liu, a jealous Angela Mao (who is hot in period garb), and Beardy teaming up to defeat a rebel (or former rebel-turned-warlord, making our heroes the rebels) played by Chen Sing. There are some twists and doublecrosses, plus a sea of poles that our heroes have to cross while avoiding traps. There's also a lot of high-quality Taiwanese choreography, with Angela Mao and John Liu shining, especially in the lengthy final fight. Their bootwork is quite excellent, although John Liu is often a bit too "Look how flexible my leg is!" in his fights. Recommended, but stay away from the 50-pack version (released as Deadly Duo), which cuts about six minutes out of the final fight.

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12 minutes ago, DrNgor said:

This week I revisited:

Snake in the Eagle's Shadow (1978)  - Not a whole lot more I can say about this that countless others haven't said already. Question: Would  a kung fu academy in the Qing Dynasty simultaneously teach Hung Gar (as exemplified by Chiu Chi-Ling, the tailor from Kung Fu Hustle) and Northern Praying Mantis (as exemplified by the school's star student, played by Tino Wong)? Oh, for a better martial performance by Chiu Chi-Ling, watch Kung Fu Master Named Drunk Cat.

 

Two Great Cavaliers (1978) - This Taiwanese costumer has John Liu, a jealous Angela Mao (who is hot in period garb), and Beardy teaming up to defeat a rebel (or former rebel-turned-warlord, making our heroes the rebels) played by Chen Sing. There are some twists and doublecrosses, plus a sea of poles that our heroes have to cross while avoiding traps. There's also a lot of high-quality Taiwanese choreography, with Angela Mao and John Liu shining, especially in the lengthy final fight. Their bootwork is quite excellent, although John Liu is often a bit too "Look how flexible my leg is!" in his fights. Recommended, but stay away from the 50-pack version (released as Deadly Duo), which cuts about six minutes out of the final fight.

The only print of Deadly Duo Ive watched is the edited 50-Pack version Doc. Thanks for highlighting the fact they trimmed down the finale. The final encounter left me a little disappointed and I know why now:smile.

Edited by DragonClaws

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13 minutes ago, DragonClaws said:

The only print of Deadly Duo Ive watched is the edited 50-Pack version Doc. Thanks for highlighting the fact they trimmed down the finale. The final encounter left me a little disappointed and I know why now:smile.

You'll have to get the DVD released by Crash Cinema to see the entire final fight.

http://www.amazon.com/Great-Cavaliers-Crash-Masters-Collection/dp/B0002X7G7K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1454081054&sr=8-1&keywords=Two+Great+Cavaliers

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3 minutes ago, DrNgor said:

Thanks for the link.

Prefer the title Two Great Cavaliers, the title Deadly Duo always makes me think of the Shaw Brothers film of the same name. Another title to go onto my Amazon wish list.

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21 hours ago, Lady Jin Szu-Yi said:

Spooky Encounters (1980) - What I liked, the younger Brother Tsui and the Kyonsi chasing the police-man (Mr. Vampire priest ha ha!) I respect that Sammo was doing different things here, but the unpleasantness with Cheung's wife and the unnecessary gore weren't my thing (I can roll with gore pretty easily, but I just felt it was off here.)

When it comes to horror / ghost stuff in Hong Kong films, I prefer the emphasis on silly comedy such as Hex After Hex and Fight Among the Supers (Lu Feng was utterly hilarious in this one.)

One of the earliest classics in the horror/martial art/comedy hybrids.  Sammo was in great shape during this period.  Did you write on Mr. Vampire?  For many that is the high point of hopping vampires and would stereotype Lam Ching-ying for the rest of his life.  It was nice to see Rigor Mortis dedicate that film to him and Ricky Hui.

My review here on why I like this movie.  And a few negative points.

Edited by masterofoneinchpunch

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On 28.1.2016 at 10:12 PM, Lady Jin Szu-Yi said:

Broken Oath (1977) - Like I need an excuse to watch one of my most favorite KF villains (Zhao Cai) being evil, under-handed and breaking hands... really though, this film boasts one of the best stories I've seen in martial arts films (revenge or otherwise.)  I really like that it moves past Lady Snowblood and throws in other nifty subplots (Imperial spies etc.)  The aging make ups on the four baddies are excellent too. 

It's a very addictive film for me because I get so sucked into the world, universe once Jia Lian is an adult and Chan Wai Man is soooooooooooooooooooo great. 

Still bummed that Miss Angela Mao Ying did not have a longer fight against Chan Wai Man though, otherwise the choreography like everything else in this film, is very, very well done. 

It`s not worth of classic reputation in my opinion but after quite tedious 30 mins rest turned out to be damn fine flick. "multilple" main bad guys fight was done with style...

 

Edited by Tex Killer

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5 hours ago, masterofoneinchpunch said:

Did you write on Mr. Vampire

No. I still have memories of laughing so hard and uttering WTF during my first screening 16 years ago - ah Lam Ching-ying so awesome. Such a stone face :coveredlaugh. I respect that folks enjoy Spooky Encounters and know it was one of the first of its kind.  Outside of Enter The Fat Dragon and The Odd Couple,  I am finding Sammo's humor a bit hard to grok. I'll leave it as a cultural misunderstanding and enjoy the man in other ways.  I think the element that annoyed me the most besides the unpleasantness with the wife and the  unnecessary gore, was the utterly crappy acting of the evil Taoist wizard (Tsui's older brother.)  Yeah, I'm a bit of a wizard snob (spoiled by Wilson Tong's awesome turn as the Nanwu in the opening sequence of The Spiritual Boxer. Along with Hwang Jang-Lee and Lau Kar Wing...) 

Hey that's what makes opinions wonderful. I will politely disagree @Tex Killer for me once Angela Mao Ying gets on the vengeance trail, Broken Oath is worth it's reputation. And I didn't even mention Leung Siu-Lung whose performance almost matches Chan Wai Man as far as intensity (especially when they're fighting.)  I love when they hmph! at each other. 

Edited by Lady Jin Szu-Yi

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Um... A Profile in Anger (1984) Holy crap,  I'd forgotten this film is such a LMAO entertaining grindhouse mess... I'll be reviewing it more extensively in the February Mutual review thread. 

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On 28/1/2016 at 9:12 PM, Lady Jin Szu-Yi said:

Broken Oath (1977) - Like I need an excuse to watch one of my most favorite KF villains (Zhao Cai) being evil, under-handed and breaking hands... really though, this film boasts one of the best stories I've seen in martial arts films (revenge or otherwise.)  I really like that it moves past Lady Snowblood and throws in other nifty subplots (Imperial spies etc.)  The aging make ups on the four baddies are excellent too. 

It's a very addictive film for me because I get so sucked into the world, universe once Jia Lian is an adult and Chan Wai Man is soooooooooooooooooooo great. 

Still bummed that Miss Angela Mao Ying did not have a longer fight against Chan Wai Man though, otherwise the choreography like everything else in this film, is very, very well done. 

I'm glad that you enjoyed this one. Angela is great in it and the way she uses the scorpions is great too. One of her best movies and Bruce Liang was very good too in it.

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3 hours ago, ShawAngela said:

I'm glad that you enjoyed this one. Angela is great in it and the way she uses the scorpions is great too. One of her best movies and Bruce Liang was very good too in it.

Agreed. Leung Siu Lung was fantastic in this one.   I love Angela's little fight / exchange with Ko Cheng-Yu just before Chan Wai Man shows up and pretends to protect her.  

I had no idea that Tony Liu Jun-Guk was the lackey whom Leung Siu-Lung kills before he goes after the real big bads. Nice to keep learning about this film.

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8 hours ago, Lizardlady said:

I absolutely LOVED Peter Chan's Wizard in Spooky Encounters.

That's wonderful you loved Peter Chan in SE @Lizardlady  

If you want to check out Peter Chang in a OTT ghost fu comedy, Fight Among the Supers.  I love Lu Feng in this one, (well I love Lu Feng in almost everything); Lu was having such a good time as the God of Bowls tormenting Peter Chan. It's very funny in spots (the pig and haunting sequences were crazy fun.)  I wouldn't be surprised if Lu and Chiang Sheng purposely made this one for their children. It is very playful.  

EDIT ^ (OOPS - It's Peter Chang in this not Chan...my bad.)

Hex After Hex is very silly too, the story is a lot wackier than FATS. The climax is bonkers and Lo Meng throws himself head first into the crazy scenarios.  The other films are either serious or slightly amusing, but these two are great. 

Kind of bummed I cannot find a cheap copy of Mr. Vampire. You'd think with the ongoing popularity of that title it would be readily available even now. If you have any recommendations please fire away. 

 

Edited by Lady Jin Szu-Yi

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I would actually be up for trading my Fox release of Mr. Vampire. It's somewhat "rare" but I don't like the movie that much.. PM me if you want to try and work something out.

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I'll keep that in mind, thanks paimeifist. 

Woke up with the King of Fists and Dollars (1979) this morning. Smug wu xia Chan Wai Man is a great way to start the day (and let's hear it for the lovely Ling Chang who kicks his smug down a few pegs.)  I know I keep saying this, but I hope Terracotta release more CWM films from this period. 

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Peter Chan Lung and Peter Chang.  You ladies are talking about 2 different people:wink. I'm not a fan of Spooky Encounters.  I also didn't care much for King of Fists and Dollars.  The choreography is too casual for my tastes.  There is one good scene where CWM takes on iron head Cliff Ching Ching and another guy.  And Cheng Lui gives a good performance.  

Edited by Morgoth Bauglir

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53 minutes ago, Morgoth Bauglir said:

Peter Chan Lung and Peter Chang.  You ladies are talking about 2 different people:wink.

Thank you...:blush that would be my confusion over names not @Lizardlady (Please ignore my Fight Among the Supers talk regarding the wrong Peter then LizardLady.) 

Yeah, King of Fists and Dollars has very casual choreography, that doesn't dampen my like for the film though. Your point does me wonder why the choreography was so causal,  especially since Chiang upped his martial game considerably during this time frame. 

Edited by Lady Jin Szu-Yi

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@Lady Jin Szu-Yi & @Morgoth Bauglir Awww you guys just have bad taste! Lol, just kidding. You have both provided me with movie titles I may have never found, myself, that have provided hours of enjoyment.  I thank you both (and many more on this great forum)!  I think it was an interview with Pops that I watched that made it very clear that real martial arts & movie martial arts were very different.  I have always had a hard time watching martial competitions & that is what he was getting at.  It might be effective, but boring for the viewer, so ya gotta spice it up.  I doubt I would know a REAL martial artist actor from a big quack, as long as it holds my attention, I like it :D   When Peter Chan Lung starts his "auctioneer babble" it just makes me roll, every time.  Hasn't gotten old, yet, maybe after another 100 viewings, lol.  Gimme a Marx Brother's or 3 Stooges Marathon & I am in heaven.  I think Buster Keaton & the Keystone Cops are my all time favorites, I LOVE slapstick!  Some of that Yuen stuff I have watches is a bit TOO far out for me, though.

 

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9 hours ago, Lizardlady said:

you guys just have bad taste! Lol, just kidding. You have both provided me with movie titles I may have never found, myself, that have provided hours of enjoyment.  I thank you both (and many more on this great forum)!  I think it was an interview with Pops that I watched that made it very clear that real martial arts & movie martial arts were very different.  I have always had a hard time watching martial competitions & that is what he was getting at.  It might be effective, but boring for the viewer, so ya gotta spice it up.  I doubt I would know a REAL martial artist actor from a big quack, as long as it holds my attention, I like it :D   When Peter Chan Lung starts his "auctioneer babble" it just makes me roll, every time.  Hasn't gotten old, yet, maybe after another 100 viewings, lol.  Gimme a Marx Brother's or 3 Stooges Marathon & I am in heaven.  I think Buster Keaton & the Keystone Cops are my all time favorites, I LOVE slapstick!

So you figured out my secret love of schlock! Good heavens (ducks under computer desk)...:laugh

This forum is amazingly amazing and I appreciate the info, reviews you and so many others here provide. For someone who was seriously rusty with her Shaws and knew very little of the many wonderful old school indies and performers, I've learned a lot in the past 9 months. 

I agree with you and Pops' about martial competitions and I love made up styles as much as I do real ones. I know very few real styles or performers, but if the person can sell me on their character and skills, I'm in. 

 I also love satire/humor and slapstick (I was weaned on British comedy and Peter Sellers so I veer toward smart, silly and painful.)  I realize some of Sammo's humor might be lost on me due to cultural differences (although hopping gyonsi never fail to make me chuckle), so I need a very obvious visual for his humor.  I think if the film left out the quasi-serious and nasty elements (you can do gore and be hilarious - hi Evil Dead 2!), I'd probably be cheerleading it and Peter all over the place (despite my wizard snob.) 

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Return to the 36th Chamber - According to Thomas Weisser's Asian Cult Cinema, this movie was the result of Shaw Brothers pressuring Lau Kar-Leung into making a comedy. It's a slight, but fairly entertaining kung fu comedy about a guy (Gordon Liu) pretending to be the famous monk San Te in order to pressure the boss of a dye factory into improving their workers' salaries. After he gets his butt handed to him in a fight, he goes to the Shaolin Temple to study under the real San Te. The movie shares the same major flaw as Legendary Weapons of China in that the best (and practically only) fight action is saved for the last act. The first act is comedy, the second act is training (although not as interesting as the previous movie, The 36th Chamber of Shaolin), and then finally Gordon Liu gets revenge on the dye workers. The scaffold training and customized sawhorses feel a little contrived, but are well choreographed and Lau Kar-Leung gets some nice bootwork out of Kwan Yung Moon. 

Note: Weisser also states that Shaolin and Wu Tang was the serious follow-up that Gordon Liu wanted to make to The 36th Chamber of Shaolin, but couldn't.

Dragon on Fire (1978) aka Enter Three Dragons 

Okay, so we begin with a dirty Diamond deal gone sour when the buyer, Sammy (Samuel Walls), is knocked out and relieved of the merchandise. Afraid to face his boss, Shen Ti (Chiang Tao), Sammy enlists the help of a friend, Dragon Hung (Bruce Lai, looking like Bruce Lee with thick eyebrows and a five o'clock shadow). At the airport, the guy sent to pick up Dragon Hung ends up picking up Dragon Yung (Bruce Thai, looking like Bruce Lee with mustache stubble) instead. Dragon Hung wanders around beats up some people before finally finding Sammy and his friend, Min Hung (Cheung Lik). Dragon Yung gets in a few fights and then spends the rest of the movie tied up, making one wonder why he was even included in the film in the first place. There's also Dragon Hung's brother, Bruce Hung (Dragon Lee, the unholy love child of Bruce Lee and Bolo Yeung), who'll Wander in and out of the movie until the last couple of fights. 

Long story short: Sammy was betrayed by Wong (Tiger Yang), Shen Ti's main henchman. Shen Ti stages a fake Diamond deal to unmask Wong's treachery. Unfortunately, the henchman Shen employs to help him beat Wong is a double agente for another crime boss, Kao Fei (Philip Ko Fei). Everybody ends up dead. Sammy goes to Kao Fei's place to rescue Min Hung's sister, Katie. What he gets instead is a royal butt-whooping at the hands of hired muscle Bolo (gee, I wonder who plays him). So it's up to Dragon Hung and Min Hung to pick up the slack and kick the living s*** out of everybody. And yeah, Bruce Hung will eventually show up just to beat people up, especially after a Shaolin abbot of questionable virtues tells him that Buddhism teaches one to return evil for evil. And Dragon Yung will do jack s***. 

If you can ignore the confusing story, the legendarily laughable dialog, scenes that make no sense whatsoever, and everything that isn't a fight scene, you can enjoy this movie. The fights are frequente and very good, if a little cheesy and repetitive. Everybody who isn't a Bruce Lee imitator dresses and fights as if they walked off the set of a kung fu period piece. Bruce Lai/Chang Yi Tao gets the most fight scenes, and he proves to be a really good kicker. Kudos to the filmmakers for giving him an especially long fight with Bolo Yeung, who gets to show off more moves than in other films I've seen him in. Dragon Lee is hammy as usual, but he shoots off some nice kicks, especially in the last fights. Bobby Walls does an interesting mix of tae kwon do kicks and hung gar. He looks a little hunchy, probably because of the height difference, but he's a fine addition to the list of talented black actors showing up in HK cinema. Cheung Lik does the usual late 70s mix of Southern styles and is fine. And Philip Ko Fei is in fine form as the main villain, with an eclectic mix of styles presented in the mannered old school form. It takes forever to beat him, and I'm disappointed that the three Bruce Lee clones didn't triple team at the very end. From a purely kung fu point of view, this is one of the better Brucesploitation films I've ever seen. Come for the fights and stay for the wonderfully goofy dubbing.

Descendant of Wing Chun (1978) - Made the same year as Sammo Hung's masterpiece Warriors two, this is sort of the poor man's take on the same subject matter, as directed and choreographed by Huang Ha, the "one cripple comes in, two come out" guy in Drunken Master. This time we have Norman Tsui Siu-Keung as Moneychanger Wah (Casanova Wong's role from WT); Melvin Wong as Leung Tsan (Leung Kar-Yan's role); and Hon Yee-Sang (who played the fat gangster hiding out at the club in the first Project A movie) in the Sammo Hung role. The fighting is all solid (lots of crisp wing chun on display and some decent Southern Eagle Claw from villains Lee Hoi-San and Fung Hak-On, who just passed away this week), even if nothing sticks out. Most wing chun enthusiasts should be pleased with the action here. The main problem is the script, which pulls a Kung Fu Hustle and switches protagonists at the hour point. Top-billed Tsui Siu-Keung is nothing but a supporting character until the end, when he suddenly becomes the main guy. Since Moneychanger Wah had been training at Shaolin, the fact that middle act largely forgets about him is a big disappointment. The rest of the movie focuses on Hon Yee-Sang's Ah Kwei until a tragic turn of events in the third act. This was released by Tai Seng along with Legend of the Drunken Tiger as part of their "Shaolin Classic Series". 

A Queen's Ransom (1975) - George Lazenby leads a band of criminals (including Jimmy Wang Yu and Bolo Yeung) to Hong Kong in order to assassinate Queen Elizabeth II on a scheduled visit to the region. The police find out after one of the assassins drunkenly makes cryptic remarks to a bar hostess/prostitute at her house. Meanwhile, a deposed Burmese (or Cambodian, depending on the version you're watching) princess (kung fu queen Angela Mao) is hanging out in the sticks of a Hong Kong while her people, with the help of the local Triads, are smuggling gold and arms out of her country and into HK, presumably for a counter-Coup of sorts. The two story threads eventually meet up, first coincidentally and then in a way I personally didn't see coming. There isn't a whole lof of action here, and when there is, it's not very satisfying. While Lazenby gave a good physical performance in On Her Majesty's Secret Service, watching him beat the snot out of Angela Mao is not my idea of a good time at the movies. In the end, the film is a colossal waste of a time of the talents involved.

When Tae Kwon Do Strikes (1973) - I actually enjoyed this quite a bit. It takes Angela Mao 25 minutes to show up, but once she does, the woman puts on a 20 minute of head-kicking goodness that ranks with her very best work. The story is run-of-the-mill stuff, with the Japanese occupiers of Korea being the jerk-offs they always are, and it's up to the tae kwon do-kicking resistance, led by Jhoon Rhee, to help fight them off. His team includes Caucasian actress Ann Winton (who outkicks Jhoon) and Carter Wong (who's a little slow, but powerful, much like Kam Kong). Angela Mao shows up as a Chinawoman who's sympathetic to the Koreans' cause. There's a lot of fighting, but Angela sticks out the most. Jhoon was OK, but you'd think he'd put on a better show (which makes it a little disappointing when he asks Angela to interrupt the final fight to let him take over). Huang In-Sik shows up a the end to fight the good guys, but he's performed better in other films. This movie features a moment of female nudity so gratuitous, that you can't help but wonder if director Huang Feng or producer Raymond Chow looked at the final product and complained about the lack of cheesecake in the proceedings.

The Tournament (1974) - Another Angela Mao movie that casts her as the daughter of a kung fu school instructor who's a member of the local martial arts association. When a student's sister is kidnapped by the local extortion racket for failing to pay protection money, the master consents to let the student and his son (Carter Wong) go to Thailand to participate in a kickboxing tournament. Both are whooped soundly and cause Chinese kung fu to lose face, resulting in the instructor being ostracized from the kung fu community. So Angela Mao steps up to the plate and seeks to study Muay Thai in order to restore honor to her father's school and Chinese martial arts on the whole. The movie takes about 40 minutes to really get going, there is no central villain, and two subplots involving different sets of criminals are dropped almost as quickly as they are brought up, but the fight action is among the very best of the first half of the 70s. Angela has probably never looked better and the film should be viewed by fight fans just on that basis alone. The showstopper is an 11-minute sequence where she fights Sammo Hung, hapkido master Whang In-Sik, Wilson Tong and several others in rapid succession.

 

Tower of Death (1980) 

Starring: Bruce Lee, Kim Tai-Chung, Roy Horan, Legendary Superkicker Hwang Jang Lee, Miranda Austin, Lee Hoi-San, Tiger Yang 

Director: Ng See-Yuen 

Action Director: Yuen Woo-Ping (although I've been told that Corey Yuen and Sammo Hung contributed, too) 

I have an unconditional love for the first Game of Death. I have no shame in admitting it to be my favorite Bruce Lee movie. I'm the sort of person who gets quite sad inside when I see the movie receiving one-star reviews from genre fans. It breaks my heart to see such entertaining cinema get trashed so much because of a few goofty attempts to mix Bruce Lee into new footage. I think it was the whole "Let's bash Game of Death while we praise Tower of Death" attitude of some reviewers that kept me from watching this, despite the promise of seeing more Yuen Woo-Ping-choreographed Hwang Jang Lee fight scenes. As it turns out, this one of the great Jade Screen kickfests, right up there with Call Me Dragon, Secret Rivals and In the Line of Duty 4. 

The story is a little bizarre. Apparently it went public after the events of the first movie that chopsockey superstar Billy Lo (Bruce Lee and Kim Tai Chung...and perhaps Yuen Biao?) didn't actually die, but faked his death in order to take down the Syndicate. Billy doesn't seem to be acting anymore, but spends his time visiting friends like Chin Ku (Hwang Jang Lee) and chiding his younger, porn-obsessed brother, Bobby (Kim Tai Chung), about not taking his training seriously. Chin Ku dies under mysterious circumstances and Billy tries to figure out what happened. At the funeral, a helicopter shows up to steal the coffin. Billy tries to stop it, but is killed by a poison dart. Enter Bobby Lo, who travels to Japan to find out what happened and avenge Billy's death. He is directed to Lewis (Roy Horan), a friend of Chin Ku's who lives at a palace filled with karate guards, lions and peacocks. Strange stuff starts happening after Bobby arrives, including cinemas only example of putting a kung fu fight with a man in a lion costume AND full frontal female nudity (courtesy of Miranda Austin, whose make-up looks like it was applied via Homer Simpson's shotgun-makeup contraption) in the same scene... 

The first forty minutes follow Billy Lo's character and is made up largely of unused, re-dubbed Enter the Dragon footage, which must've been pretty ingenious at the time. But then the film pulls a Psycho and focuses on the the non-Bruce Lee character. That's good, since it means that the last 50 minutes don't have to rely on goofy cutaways to Bruce Lee's face just to remind us that this is a Bruce Lee movie. The last twenty-five minutes or so take a real turn for the bizarre once we figure out what's going on and who's behind the evil plot. It's pretty unbelievable, even by genre standards, but oh so fun. 

The action comes quite frequently, courtesy of Yuen Woo-Ping. According to "City on Fire," Corey Yuen directed the alleway fight sequence and the one at the strip club and did co-directing duties for the film. Sammo Hung directed the fight between Kim Tai-Chung/Yuen Biao (I'm guessing that Kim Tai-Chung's more impressive moves were performanced by Yuen Biao, which is *very* frequente) vs. Casanova Wong fight, Hwang's opening fight, and Roy Horan's fight with the challengers. Yuen Woo-Ping would've choreographed basically everything in the last 30 minutes of the movie. Everything is of an extremely high standard. We're talking "best Brucesploitation fight choreography" level here. The kicks are marvelous, especially in the fight with Casanova Wong, which had been edited out of the original Game of Death. Hwang Jang Lee has done better kicking, but he's extremely versatile here, doing some nice handwork and some elaborate swordplay at the finale. You know, for being a porn-addicted layabout, Bobby Lo is even more invinicible than his brother Billy Lo ever was. I must try that method of martial arts training...I jest. 

So yeah, this movie comes highly recommended by me. Enjoy!

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