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What ELSE (other than KUNG FU) has everyone been watching?

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On 11/13/2018 at 1:55 PM, DragonClaws said:

 

That's cool, like I said, my knowledge of Deadpool, was limited to fan comments here.

Are you a fan?, and do you think the sequel is an improvement, or just more of the same?.

I’m not a fan of the comics but I like the movies. The second one is a little bigger and more polished but, at the end of the day, I see why people might say it’s more of the same.

But hey, I’ll always like a film that does Juggernaut right.

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Bloody Ballet (aka Fantasma) [Brett Mullen, 2018]: One would consider this a rip-off of Suspiria and in a way, it is more of an homage to the giallo genre, about a ballet dancer who begins to have recurring nightmares about her past while at the same time, a serial killer begins a gory killing spree against members of the ballet school. What helps is that "scream queen" Debbie Rochon goes against type and plays a straight role as the troubled young woman's therapist and Caroline Williams playing the owner of the ballet school. A shocking twist arrives in the last ten minutes of the film that makes this quite a watchable film, even if some of the death scenes made me cringe a little.

Mrs. Claus (aka Stirring) [Troy Escamilla, 2018]: A hazing prank at a sorority house forces a pledge to viciously murder the sorority head before killing herself. Ten years later, the late sorority head's sister decides to throw a Christmas party at the old house. However, someone is decked out in a Leatherface-like old lady mask and Christmas outfit and begins offing the partygoers. Pretty decent film with inventive kills which also has a bit of predictability. Some good appearances from horror film vets and "scream queens" Helene Udy (My Bloody Valentine) and Brinke Stevens (The Slumber Party Massacre). 

Mobile Homes [Vladimir de Fontenay, 2018]: A young mother and her domineering boyfriend are constantly on the move with the mother's 8-year son from hotel to hotel and sometimes break in people's houses when they are away on vacation. When the group breaks into a mobile home, the boyfriend is caught and is forced to flee. To make amends, the mother gets a job with the property manager by sprucing up the mobile homes, eventually forging a much needed bond between mother and son...until the boyfriend returns. Very dramatic and moving performances by Imogen Poots as the young mother and newcomer Frank Oulton as the son. Callum Turner's totally a-hole role of the boyfriend was originally meant for Anton Yelchin before his tragic death at 27. Turner does quite well, but guarantee you will hate his character throughout. 

China Salesman [Tan Bing, 2017]: What the hell? This was one of those movies you would watch just for curious levels and then say "never again". Granted, it has both Mike Tyson and Steven Seagal, but action-wise, the only thing I liked was the very short fight pitting Tyson against three high kicking guys. Tyson vs. Seagal? Don't get me started...one of the worst fights ever on celluloid. Tyson vs. Van Damme in Kickboxer: Retaliation was so much better than Tyson vs. Seagal. It's not that the story, which involved telecommunications in Africa, was bad, it was just poorly executed thanks to some very atrocious acting. I think Clovis Fouin's Michael could almost rank with Nic Cage for overacting to a non-tolerant level.

Crazy Rich Asians [Jon M. Chu, 2018]: I haven't read the novel, but I did enjoy the film adaptation and @Drunken Monk is practically on the ball with nearly everything. I did find Awkwafina the necessary comic relief, even if she was annoying at times. However, the supporting character actor that cracked me up was Nico Santos, who reminded me of Stanley Tucci's Nigel in The Devil Wears Prada. It was also great seeing the legendary Lisa Lu as Michelle Yeoh's mother-in-law, who has a liking for Rachel more than Michelle. Plus, Constance Wu is one of my favorite actors, thanks to Fresh Off the Boat

Santa's Summer House [Mary Crawford aka David DeCoteau, 2012]: This one really surprised me. For those who are used to DeCoteau's previous works, this is a welcome change for his filmography as he delves into a full-out family film that features some of the big names of 70's-90's action films. A mysterious fog sends a group of vacationers to a mysterious summer house. They learn that the house belongs to none other than Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus, the former who picked this group out to spread some early Christmas magic to help them cope with their various issues. I was surprised at how fun the cast was having when they play croquet, but there is also some emotional drama that at one point towards the end, nearly made me shed a tear. It should be mentioned that the action stars in question are Chris Mitchum as Santa, Cynthia Rothrock as Mrs. Claus, Gary Daniels and Kathy Long as a couple whose constant working have alienated them from their son, and Daniel Bernhardt as an arrogant rocket scientist. Sounds ridiculous, but IMO, better than I expected.

Edited by AlbertV

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"I want my cane"

Creepshow(1982) -  George A.Romero Directs this Stephen King written Horror anthology, inspired by 1950s American, pulp horror comics. Some might call it, the ultimate horror collaboration, with King, Romero and practical SFX king, Tom Savini, on board?. We get five un-related Horror stories, crammed into one feature length run-time. The film breezes by, with stories filled with the bizarre, strange, and outright macabre. The humour and horror elements, for the most part, work really-well together, but sometimes it can be jarring. Writer King, makes a cameo appearance, playing the country hick, who gets more than he bargained for, in The Lonely Death of Jordy Verril. Leslie Neilsen, makes an appearance, in a far from comedic role, starring alongside future Cheer's star Ted Danson, in a story about a husband, whose wife cheats on him.  There's a great performance, from actress Carrie Nye, as Sylvia Grantham, in the opening Fathers Day story. We also get an early role from Ed Harris, shortly after making an appearance in the underrated, Charles Bronson flick Borderline.

 

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"Aristocrats and criminals have a lot in common. They're both selfish, get bored easily, and have access to wads of cash they didn't have to work honestly to get"

Legend(2015) -  The well told violent Krays story, gets the big budget treatment, in this Brian Helgeland directed film, about the well-known, London crime twins. Your-enjoyment, of this film, will depend on, just how many screen/printed versions of their story, you have viewed. There's certainly more truth in this version, though it does romanticize things at times. Everyone involved, is well cast, with some great performances all round. Though it's a real shame we didn’t get to see more of Christopher Eccleston's policeman, Nipper Read. Tom Hardy delivers a strong performance, playing both, of the Kray twins, this is done seamlessly, thanks to modern special FX. However, there's nothing to really make it stand out, from all the other British crime films out-there. Had this come out in the late 90's, I'm sure it would have been praised a lot more. There's just been so many small budget films, based on the lives of the notorious gangsters. The narration, by actress Emily Browning, is a real nice, original touch, she plays the wife of Reggie Kray with style and a touch of class.

 

Emily Browning as Frances Shear, and Tom Hardy as Reggie Kray.

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Edited by DragonClaws

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Streets of Fire (1984) - This is one of the few movies I ever walked out of, back when it opened theatrically. The dialog was so trite, and the plot no better.  The music sounded great, if derivative.  The director, Walter Hill (The Warriors), "wanted to go with a young group of relative unknowns".  (Wikipedia)  So the most interesting part of watching Streets of Fire on cable now is seeing how the unknowns went on to greater things after this movie.  Diane Lane, just a pretty face as the young singer, Ellen Aim, went on to star in Under the Tuscan Sun and Must Love Dogs, and is still busy acting.  With her makeup and big hair, I didn't recognize her in Streets of Fire.  (She didn't really sing in the movie; the voices of Laurie Sargent and Holly Sherwood were combined as Ellen Aim's singing voice.)  Rick Moranis, the annoying Billy Fish, co-starred in Ghostbusters (which opened a week after Streets of Fire).  Michael Paré (the hero Tom Cody) said, "Rick Moranis drove me out of my mind.  There's this whole wave of insult comedy.  In the real world, if someone insults you a couple of times, you can smack them.  Or punch them.  You can't do that on a movie set."  Amy Madigan, playing the tough female McCoy, is still busy acting.  Willem Dafoe, the villainous bike gang leader Raven, went on to fame in better films, when he looked more mature.  One of the most recent movies he appeared in is Aquaman.  Deborah Van Valkenburgh, who played Tom Cody's sister, appeared in TV series until 2016.  Richard Lawson (the black cop Ed Price) still appears in TV episodes.  Bill Paxton (Clyde the Bartender in the movie) was a busy actor until his death in 2017.  Robert Townsend (The Meteor Man) was one of the singing Sorels in Streets of Fire.  He has been busy as a producer, and was last seen in two Black Lightning episodes.  Mykelti Williamson (Forrest Gump), another singing Sorel, has been acting in TV episodes.  Elizabeth Daily (aka E.G. Daily, the hanger-on Baby Doll in the movie) keeps busy with TV episodes and as a voice actress.  Lynne Thigpen, a subway motorwoman in the movie, went on to appear in nearly 300 episodes of Where in the World Is 'Carmen Sandiego? and as Ella Farmer in The District series.  She died in 2003 of a cerebral hemorrhage.  Ed Begley Jr., who appeared briefly as Ben Gunn (named after the Treasure Island character?), a street bum, must be one of the busiest of actors.  Lately he has been in Arrested Development and Better Call Saul.  (Not to mention sending me solicitations to "Save the Bees".)  Peter Jason, with a very familiar face, played a cop in the movie.  He has also been in lots of movies, TV episodes and shorts, including Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.  Kathy Griffin had an uncredited role as a concertgoer in Streets of Fire.

The climactic fight between Tom Cody and Raven was filmed choppily in short clips, not so great fight choreography .  "Hill did not want the film to be especially violent - there would be no blood and no one would die."  (Wikipedia)  So Streets of Fire wound up getting a PG rating.         

Edited by whitesnake

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Massacre in dinosaur valley.  Plane with some explorers crashes into jungle and it`s survival time when cannibals and various other dangers of the jungle take their toll...Lot cliches, bad actors but fun adventure movie with less red paint than one would expect...

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Out for a kill. Very bad plot even for Seagal movie, despite lots of action repellent viewing experience when Seagal takes chinese tong members out of business....Unintentional or not but most entertaining scenes are when in beginning crowded table of chinese criminals gets eventually emptier as Seagal sends thugs to chinese hell during flick and boss gets rapidly upset...

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Just watched the final episode of the most recent season of Its Always Sunny in Philidelphia. The episode's lead up really doesnt come across as anything noteworthy, seemingly a bit redundant and typical. However it completely pays off with an interpretive dance closing that is breathtaking. The dance choreography here is amazing, and its depiction of depression and self-worth really show through. very impressed.

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On 12/11/2018 at 8:22 AM, whitesnake said:

Streets of Fire (1984) - This is one of the few movies I ever walked out of, back when it opened theatrically.      

I wasn't quite born yet when it came out, but I atoned for it by taking my GF to see it in theatre a few months ago when it had a nationwide re-release in Japan 😂

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Wheelman (USA, 2018) [Netflix] - 3.5/5
A getaway driver receives a threatening call while on a gig. Tightly paced at just 82 minutes and claustrophobically filmed almost entirely from inside the car, this is less an action film and more of a tense, well written thriller with a good leading performance by Frank Grillo.

Annihilation (USA, 2018) [Netflix] - 3.5/5
Interesting, visually striking science fiction horror ultimately falls a little short. For an intellectual film it features odd lapses in logic (e.g. the heroines are nearly killed by a giant river creature; the next morning they go downriver without a worry in their minds as if they knew what the script says) and doesn't feature as much depth as you'd wish. Still very good, but Garland's first, smaller scale film Ex Machina got more out of its topic matter.

The Outsider (USA, 2018) [Netflix] - 3.5/5
A highly entertaing twist to the usual yakuza film formula with Jared Leto as gaijin yakuza in 1950s Osaka and Kobe. The unusual protagonist adds a constant tension to a film that, with its depictions of Japanese yakuza, police and prison guards as corrupt animals... is otherwise just like any standard Japanese yakuza film! Indeed, there's is just a little bit too much familiarity to the ingredients as well as some tourist touring with one sumo, sauna or tattoo scene too much. The casting however is excellent (Kippei Shiina, Min Tanaka, Shun Sugata, Tadanobu Asano, Shioli Kutsuna) and the 50s milieu is nicely brought to life with good production values.

Obviously not without flaws, but to me some of the film’s poor reception strikes as a mix of modern sensitivity (oh no, don’t steal the poor Japanese their culture and trick their clueless actors into your film) and lack of knowledge of Japanese genre cinema. Of course you can criticize the film for clichés or being a movie for people who have never seen Fukasaku, Kitano or Miike films, but then, those are the genre’s most unique filmmakers. The criticism is valid if you take this approach, yes, but you’d have to disown 95% of Japanese genre cinema, including a lot of movies by genre favourites like Sadao Nakajima, on the same basis and I don’t see that happening.

 

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One of the longest running threads on KFF and one of my faves over the years.  I've watched some repeat viewings of late.

The Wrestler (2008)  Rourke does an admirable job here. Really feel the guy's pain.

Christmas in Connecticut (1945)  Love me some Barbara Stanwyck. Classic holiday tale.

Kagemusha (1980)  Felt if Akira Kurosawa had cut 45-60 minutes out and it would have been better.

Noah (2014) Started out decent enough but I didn't care for Crowe's character turning crazy later.

Trading Places (1983)  There's funny and there-is-funny! Still holds up.

Lady in the Water (2006)  MNS made a half-dozen nice films in a row, including this one. Then came .. After Earth. Has he rebounded back to his old self yet?

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Venom (Ruben Fleischer, 2018): A solid Sony-Marvel film that stars Tom Hardy as news reporter Eddie Brock, who ends up disgraced when he decides to interview Carlton Drake, the head of the Life Foundation, who is under suspicion for human experimentation, and loses not only his job but his lawyer fiancee because she was set to get a lawsuit ready for Drake until Eddie's involvement. Six months later, Eddie learns the truth about Drake and upon an impromptu investigation, merges with an alien symbiote to become the titular anti-hero and Spider-Man nemesis. Hardy does a pretty good job as the embittered Brock, having to cope with his newfound power and while he didn't do motion capture for Venom, he did provide the voice, which is a meshing of Bane from Dark Knight Rises and Christian Bale's Batman gruffy voice. Some nice one-liner wit from Venom and then there's the mid-credit sequence which will set up what's pretty much a guaranteed sequel as the film has raked in over 850 million worldwide.

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I, Daniel Blake(2016) - Direct, no non-sense film, that packs a real emotional punch, from the genius minds of Ken Loach, veteran of over 50 films, and ace screen writer Paul Laverty. A close to retirement carpenter, Daniel Blake(Dave Johns), suffers a heart attack, and must battle the unemployment agency, and it's, current bureaucratic approach to dealing with people, in many different circumstances. For this movie, might have been made in 2016, but it’s sadly become more relevant as the years have passed by. In the film, Daniel Blake is offered a drink of water, at the job centre, in one scene. The current Tory government, decided to remove water machines from public serive building, due to further financial cut backs. If you or anyone you know, has had to claim Job Seeker's Allowance in the U.K, for any reason, will be able to relate, to this no frills, honest and touching film.

This production wasn’t created to just entertain you for an hour and a half, it's making a very bold statement. There's a solid cast, it’s hard to really pass out credit to only a few of them. Leads Dave Johns and Hayley Squires bring are on top form, as Daniel and Katie, too very different people, suffering the same hardships, who form a strong friendship. It's easy to understand how this film won the 2016 Palme d'Or at Cannes. The second time the 79-year old director and social campaigner, has received the award. His direction works superbly with Pau Laverty well researched script.

 

Quote

"I am not a client, a customer, nor a service user. "I am not a shirker, a scrounger, a beggar, nor a thief. "I'm not a National Insurance Number or blip on a screen. "I paid my dues, never a penny short, and proud to do so. "I don't tug the forelock, but look my neighbour in the eye and help him if I can. "I don't accept or seek charity. "My name is Daniel Blake. I am a man, not a dog. "As such, I demand my rights. "I demand you treat me with respect. "I, Daniel Blake, am a citizen, "nothing more and nothing less."Thank you.

 

 

(L-R) actors Briana Shann, Hayley Squires, Dave Johns, and Dylan Mckiernman.

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Edited by DragonClaws

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Jojo Part 5

UFC

Daredevil (2nd viewing in progress)

The Punisher (1st viewing completed a weeks ago. Waiting for season 2!)

Baki Season 3 (waiting for Netflix to upload the other 13 episodes. Besides super inconsistent animation, I'm loving this!)

Might watch Rizin tonight.

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Black Panther(2018) - There's a whole arguement, about wether this movie should be classed as a Martial Arts flick?, maybe this is the wrong thread for discussing it?. There was a lot of hype around this movie, you got the impression, Disney was taking a gamble, or at least they thought they were taking a risk by making this film?. It was heavily/overly promoted, maybe for this reaason?, with both critics and fans, singing its praises. It's yet another decent entry in the Marvel filmography, and I enjoyed it as much as The Avenger's flicks, and other Marvel related movies. However, I still dont understand why people rated it so highly?. With the way it was praised, I was expecting something a lot more, than it did deliver in the end. I'm not talking about the film's racial impact n Hollywood, there's been plenty of black action stars, since the days of Jim Kelly clobbering the mob, in Black Belt Jones(1973). The cast were all had a strong presence, with Michael B.Jordan and Lupita Nyong'o, putting on two stand out performances. Chadwick Boseman holds it all together, as the title character, of which I'm sure will get further on-screen adventures, in the future. In the end, it an enjoable and entertaining film, but in terms of filmaking, I wouldnt rate it any higher or lower, than other movies in the Marvel cinematic Universe.

 

The Black Panther, shows off his power steering.

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Edited by DragonClaws

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The Demonologist [J.M. Stelly, 2018]: Charmed's Brian Krause plays the titular character, a detective who while investigating a series of ritual-style murders, discovers he is the latest in line to get the powers to become a hunter of demons as he is the direct descendant of Lucifer himself. Using his newfound powers, the detective uncovers a plot to unleash the four Demon Kings of Hell and he is the only one capable of stopping them. Starts out slow, but gets better as the film progresses even though it only took 10 days to shoot (did an interview with Krause himself). I hope there will be a sequel that will exceed the set-up of this film.

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Sixteen Candles (USA, 1984) [Netflix] - 3.5/5
John Hughes' debut film about the lovely Molly Ringwald with a crush on a boy she's afraid to talk to, and a geek (Anthony Michael Hall) trying to score with her, takes turns being dumb and totally adorable. The shower boob scene took me by a surprise.

The Breakfast Club (USA, 1985) [Netflix] - 4.5/5
Questionable ending (some might call it realism) aside brilliantly written youth film about a mixed bunch of kids having to spend a Saturday in detention together. It's funny that the best two films of 1985 are called Typhoon Club and The Breakfast Club, both are about kids trapped in a school building, and both were filmed in 1984 on opposite sides of the world.

Weird Science  (USA, 1985) [Netflix] - 2.5/5
Adolescent fantasy about two nerds creating their dream woman is too tame to really take off, but there are some funny and adorable bits. Bill Paxton and Kelly LeBrock's accent are the best things about it.

Ferris Bueller's Day Off (USA, 1986) [Netflix] - 1.5/5
Insanely over-rated, dull as dishwater comedy with the irritating Matthew Broderick as a high school kid skipping school. Drug addict Charlie Sheen and vengeful principal Jeffrey Jones are the only funny characters.

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The Last Waltz

I was just thinking what made last waltz so alluring was scorses direction as well as robbie robertsons parts, he really comes across more like an actor than a musician, almost like watching clockwork orange or something

the musicians killed it, bob and vans stage presence were awesome, van was super invested in Caravan, which is one of my favorite and most catchy van songs

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27 minutes ago, Koravec said:

The Last Waltz

I was just thinking what made last waltz so alluring was scorses direction as well as robbie robertsons parts, he really comes across more like an actor than a musician, almost like watching clockwork orange or something

the musicians killed it, bob and vans stage presence were awesome, van was super invested in Caravan, which is one of my favorite and most catchy van songs

 

Did you pick up the recent Blu-Ray re-issue?, curious how much of an improvement it is over the DVD?.

 

Roberston went on to get some acting work, he's in the Jack Nicholson film, The Crossing Guard(1995), he also went on to do some soundtracks, including the Colour of Moey(1981). Levon Helm appeared in Fire Dwon Below, the Seagal film, probably not his career highight acting wise.

I thought the late Rick Danko was also a natural in-front of the camera, the scene where he plays a song from his then, new album, is a a favorite of mine.

 

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2 hours ago, DragonClaws said:

Did you pick up the recent Blu-Ray re-issue?, curious how much of an improvement it is over the DVD?.

Roberston went on to get some acting work,

Im a huge Dylan and Morrison fan (like Neil Young too) so my friend kept insisting I watch it, so I saw it when I went over there. 

It was my first watch so I cant say how much better it looked than the DVD, but it did look pretty nice. Cant imagine it looked insanely better myself. 

Thats interesting that Robertson started acting, didnt know that.

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The Amityville Murders (Daniel Farrands, 2019): You all probably know The Amityville Horror, but has anyone heard of the 1974 series of murders that took place at 112 Ocean Avenue in Amityville, NY. This is the story of the events that led up to Ronald "Butch" DeFeo Jr. killing his entire family with a high-powered rifle, claiming that he heard voices and saw visions. While the film is classified as a horror film, it is actually mostly a tense emotional drama about how DeFeo Jr. was constantly abused by his domineering father and despite attempts by his mother and sister to save him, there are shades of the supernatural in the final 20 minutes of the film. Great performances by John Robinson as the young DeFeo with Paul-Ben Victor as his father and Diane Franklin as his mother (link is interview I did with her...as an 80s fan I was stoked!). This is Franklin's second Amityville movie (she was a pivotal role in 1982's Amityville II: The Posession)

The Grinch (Yarrow Cheney and Scott Mosier, 2018): Took the kids to see this at our nearby dollar theater this past weekend. It was okay, but I didn't like a few story elements, mostly involving Cindy Lou Who this time around. I did like Benedict Cumberbatch's take on the Grinch and understanding why he didn't like Christmas as opposed to Jim Carrey's take. Kenan Thompson's Mr. Bricklebaum was a highlight for me. He was just hilarious, making any scene he was in work. Pharrell Williams' narration just seemed a little out of place though. Despite all of it, it's not a bad adaptation, but it's not exactly a great one either. 

Edited by AlbertV

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Tom Berenger returns to Sniper movies after being absent in "sniper reloaded" and teams to his son to track down sniper who has gone nuts and kills his ex army fellows...

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Sniper team is on a job to protect gasline in Georgia...

 

 

Movies about snipers are great fun when done properly but both above suffer from too weak storyline. Legacy even more but would not praise ghost shooter either. Entertaining enough to view once without yawning but never reason to watch again..hopefully "ultimate kill" turns out to be better.

 

Also been through 9 episodes of Legends of tomorrow season 3. Just as ssn2 was bit weaker than first this again dives a bit. Seems more humor been added and 7 episodes in general quite uninteresting..however on #8 it got lot better when crossover Crisis on Earth X started....never watched supergirl, flash or arrow but may need to check their series out too eventually...

 

Edited by Tex Killer

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Bohemian Rhapsody [Bryan Singer, 2018]: This is actually a really good film about the formation of the band Queen and their high rise to fame up to their mindblowing 1985 Live Aid performance. Rami Malek was great as Freddie Mercury. I actually envisioned him as a Dr. Frank N Furter as he looks to have a bit of a resemblance to Tim Curry. Gwilym Lee, Ben Hardy, and Joe Mazzello were perfectly cast as Brian May, Roger Taylor, and John Deacon. The film not only involved Queen but Freddie's personal relationship with Mary Austin, who would become "the love of his life" until his death in 1991 while his sexuality was explored. A great film about a legendary band.

The Maze Runner [Wes Ball, 2014]: The film that broke Dylan O'Brien from his role as Stiles in the Teen Wolf reboot as he plays Thomas, a young man who mysteriously awakens in a place called The Glade and may be the key to finding the way out. Based on the hit YA novel by James Dashner, there were great performances from Kaya Scodelario, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, and Will Poulter.

The Scorch Trials [Wes Ball, 2015]: Picking up where The Maze Runner left off, Thomas leads the rest of the escaped Gladers to the now demolished world (a result of the sun causing the Scorch and a virus that infects people, who become known as the Flares), where they plan to find a resistance army called the Right Arm to stop WCKD, the organization responsible for the Maze.

The Death Cure [Wes Ball, 2017]: Originally meant to have come out in 2016, the film would be known as the film that lead actor Dylan O'Brien was killed in during a car stunt gone awry. Howeer, during his recovery, he managed to shoot American Assassin before going back to work on the final installment of the trilogy, where he attempts to rescue longtime friend and fellow Glader Minho, who's been kidnapped by WCKD thanks to the treachery of Teresa and put an end to WCKD once and for all. This one is a worthy finale thanks to some very surprising twists in the story.

Masters of the Universe [Gary Goddard, 1987]: I re-visited this one and I still have a soft spot for it. It seemed more for teens than kids, but hell, you gotta love Frank Langella as Skeletor and I did think Dolph Lundgren made a pretty decent He-Man. Now this just makes me want to know what's in store for the in-development reboot with the Nee Brothers directing and the story being more faithful to the original cartoon (Prince Adam and BattleKat are confirmed to be in it).

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sniper - ultimate kill. Our sharpshooter is in colombia helping DEA to arrest crimelord who has in his sleeve corrupt official and other sniper...It`s still not quality of original sniper movies but I liked this more than 2 parts made before this. Tom Berenger again makes appearance in small talk only role. Lots of action and story does it`s purpose, not necessary revisit material but far from boring.

finished legends of tomorrow season 3. as mentioned in post earlier felt humor been added but have to say I was stunned when legends summoned ultimate warrior in finale...was waiting some graceful troop but turned out to be furry toy. And cliffhanger was so cheap shot quite sure not going for season 4. Crisis on earth-x were great episodes but thats all...

 

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The Graduate(1967) - Director Mike Nichols, won an Oscar for Best Director, for this now well told tale. A young man Ben Braddock(Dustin Hoffman) start's an affair, with the much older, more experienced, seductive, and manipulative, Mrs Robinson(Anne Bankroft). With a some superb acoustic/vocal harmonies, from 60's musicians, Simon & Garthfunkel. Providing a solid and very hip for the time, soundtrack. In the context of todays morals and moods, a predatory female, chasing and seducing a young man, is certainly not a common theme in contemporary Hollywood. In today’s world, would Hoffman’s character, be claiming he was sexually harassed?.

It has been over a good decade since I watched this film, when I wasn’t far off the age of the Hoffmans character. Watching it now, I've noticed so many different little details I missed the first-time round. Such as the scene when Ben's Mum confronts him about his late-night activities. It's clear they’ve dressed up his mum, to look very much like Mrs Robinson, right down to the hair style. The frat house for homosexual men, and how Ben get's kicked out when they discover he's straight. Look out for a young Richard Dreyfuss, in an early role, during these scenes. A film, of this age, is going to look dated, especially in the tech saturated society, we live in today. I doubt this affair could have gone so far, if people had camera phones back then. Yet it still remains what it is, a great piece of film making, done with its own atmosphere and identity.

There's plenty of good performances, but its Anne Bankroft and Hoffman, who hold it all together. The excellent Bankroft, conveys so much, just with her eyes and facial expression's alone. One very good example of this, is when she's sat staring at the T.V, flicking her cigarette ash nonchalantly into an ashtray. With a look in her eyes, that says a lot more than any words can do. When Ben comes over to take out her daughter Elaine(Katherine Ross). Another stand out scene, see's Ben fending of a horde of old wedding guests, with the use of a gold crucifix. Which is also a cool nod to the horror genre.

Here's a couple of random facts about the film, to close this short write-up. Despite the age gap in the film being much bigger, the two leads were only six years apart in age. Hoffman looked younger than he was, and she was made up to look older, than she was. Director Nichol's, turned down Robert Redford, who auditioned for the role of Ben.

 

Anne Bankroft, as Mrs Robinson.

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Dustin Hoffman, as Ben Braddock.

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Edited by DragonClaws

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The 6th Annual Live On Cinema Oscar Special

This is based off the Tim Heidecker and Gregg Turkington satirical movie review show. Oscar specials are hosted around the time of new oscars. All free on youtube.

This has been a favorite show of mine and I was really surprised to see this pop up on youtube as there werent any movie review episodes this year, I figured the show/concept was just over with. Although Id have to say I prefer the show over the Oscar Specials, but both are great! 

Highlights of the show were the one man bronzeman, Mark 'the living oscar'. And the hilarious and surprisingly impressive (in a punk-tinged way at least) cover of Bohemian Rhapsody by Tim and his band near the end!

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Profondo rosso (Italy, 1975) [BD] - 4.5/5
The better, shorter cut. Tremendously entertaining despite the far stretched plot.

Rome Armed to the Teeth (Italy, 1976) [DVD] - 2/5
Over-rated Italo crime with an admittedly kick ass score. Merli is good as a hard fisted cop, but the script and Lenzi’s direction are strangely void of highlights.

Suspiria (Italy, 1977) [BD] - 4.5/5
Synapse's 4.0 sounds incredible, but I still think the voice acting on the Italian dub is vastly better.

Conan the Barbarian (USA, 1982) [BD] - 4.5/5
Majestic adventure. The score is capable of inspiring the only YouTube comments worth reading. "I'm a woman, and I just grew balls listening to this." "I'm black but when I hear this I all of a sudden have an Austrian accent." "Man need no Viagra, Man have Conan music."

Hard Ticket to Hawaii (USA, 1987) [DVD] – 3/5
Ridge Forrester goes against drug dealers in a worthy, but cinematically even more inept trash companion for Samurai Cop and Miami Connection. The action is alright, but the acting and storytelling even worse, more DTV-like than in the fore-mentioned films, and a bit too tong in the cheek as well. The film is mainly cast with Playboy playmates who do a topless scene every 10 minutes or so, and steal too much screen time from the accidentally wonderful Ronn Moss of The Bold and The Beautiful who does karate, had loud sex, kills people in incredible ways (with a couple of downright insane kills), and is just amusing and beautiful to no end. It’s a real shame he didn’t pursue a parallel career in porny b-action films like this because that would’ve been cool beyond belief!

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Turbo Kid (Canada / Australia, 2012) [Netflix] - 2/5
Post-modern post-apocalypse with the world's most irritating female side-kick is worth enduring for its super fun splatter effects.

Nymphomaniac: Vol. I (Denmark, 2013) [Netflix] – 2/5
Nymphomaniac: Vol. II Denmark, 2013) [Netflix] – 1.5/5
Overlong and oftentimes boring, but Stellan Skarsgård is fabulous and really funny as well. Vol. 1 is the better of the two; Vol. 2 misses much of the humour though there are some good actors (Mia Goth, Willem Dafoe). Watching the Japanese versions turned out a great choice as the optical censorship saved me from the parts I didn't care to see in the first place.

Hacksaw Ridge (AU/USA, 2016) [Netflix] - 3/5
Gibson's prequel to Passion of the Christ.

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