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What Books Are You Currently Reading or Read?

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Right now I'm reading Flashman and the Angel of the Lord, part of the excellent faux-biographical Flashman series, and John Adam: Samurai, a trashy bit of action fluff involving an Englishman landing in Japan in what I assume to be the 17th century or so,

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I'm reading

The Martial Arts Film by Marilyn D. Mintz. Pretty decent old school book with Mintz giving an analyses on samurai films, Bruce Lee, classic kung fu (up to 1976) and even goe as far as the Hollywood swashbucklers.

Martial Arts: Philosophy, History, People by John Corcoran and Emil Farkas. I read this in high school and used it as a major source for my high school research project on martial arts. Nice photos and a look at some of the major events all over the world when it came to martial arts.

The Ultimate Martial Arts Encyclopedia, edited by Curtis Wong and John Little. It's all a series of articles ranging from wushu to aikido by authors such as Bruce Fontaine, Chris Casamassa and more. Not a bad book, but don't like the title so much.

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Smack dab in the middle of this months issue of Bigguns....

Better put it down though, big day at the shoe store tomorrow.

Is that an Al Bundy quote or 4 real either way I'm laughin.

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kK7y8Ou0VvM

Thought I'd post this here.

I know I have mentioned that Jack Reacher books on this thread so it seemed suitable.

Fight scene at the end doesn't look too bad either.

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Been doing a lot of reading lately...

Finished these two books:

THE TOXIC AVENGER: THE NOVEL by Lloyd Kaufman and Adam Jahnke

They amped up the novel version and added more violence and sexual content. Even changed the names of some characters, but it works here for a Troma book

WHAT I LEARNED ABOUT FILMMAKING MAKING THE TOXIC AVENGER by Lloyd Kaufman

This is the story, in his trademark manner, of how Lloyd Kaufman started his film career, making an indie feature in 1972, worked as location manager on ROCKY, pre-production manager on SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, and forming Troma Films. Really crazy at times, but a fun read.

Reading now:

RAGING BULL by Jake La Motta with Joseph Carter and Peter Savage

So far 1/2 way done...great read. If you liked the movie, definitely read the book...goes back to La Motta's days a teen working for a local mobster before learning to box in prison to well...you know if you seen the movie

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Just finished reading Darcy Paquet’s New Korean Cinema : Breaking The Waves, a compact, lucidly written 120 page primer that dissects the stupendous late 90s take-off of the Country’s movie industry. Especially from the perspective of this Chinese language movie geek its highly thought-provoking what a sizable part the gradual relaxation of Korea’s harsh censorship laws played in facilitating what became arguably one of the most exciting national cinemas in the world. Ya just wish some of those SARFT head honchos would take a cue from the Koreans instead of routinely bemoaning the weak box office showings of Chinese productions in comparison to the usual Hollywood fare.

Its an issue also given some serious thought in a very interesting essay called “Hollywood’s colonization of China’s box-office” in Robert Cain’s chinafilmbiz blog entry from May 30th (http://chinafilmbiz.wordpress.com/)

At the moment I’m immersing myself in A Tribute To Action Choreographers, another one of the truly excellent publications of the Hong Kong International Film Festival Society (HKIFF). Its a bi-lingual collection of tremendously revealing interviews with some of HK’s best known action choreographers / fight instructors plus a few equally interesting essays. Interviews not only with the usual suspects (i.e. Sammo, Ching Siu Tung or Yuen Woo Ping) but also with people you never really find much information about like Leung Siu Hung (one of my favourite AC’s) or Chin Si Ang (Sammo’s grandma born in 1909 who used to perform all her stunts herself without resorting to doubles or even safety mattresses!) and Yeung Ching Ching, one of the few females in the industry. A one-of-a-kind book! (well, more like a catalogue, really)

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Um, I actually went to the HKIFF HQ myself. Its in Kwun Tong (HK’s Kowloon side), just a 5 minutes walk from the MRT station. Adress is 21 F(loor), Millenium City 3; 370 Kwun Tong Rd. They’re extremely helpful there, you can browse all their publications in the waiting area if front of the office and they’ll sell ‘em to you on the spot. I payed what I consider a chicken-fee for Action Choreographers, think about 80 HKD. Equally wonderful are four of their smaller-sized publications in their Actor/Filmmaker/Director in Focus series:

Eric Tsang

Herman Yau

Wai Ka-Fai

Andy Lau

The latter is the only one I read so far, it contains excellent essays by film crits like Sek Kei and Bryan Chang as well as the longest and most in-depth interview with Lau that I ever came across. All their in-print books are also available via their website, they told me.

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Yes, indeed. A good one to have if you're into these films. I definitely recommend.

A Tribute To Action Choreographers' date= another one of the truly excellent publications of the Hong Kong International Film Festival Society (HKIFF).

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A Tribute To Action Choreographers is excellent. Only down side- though most of it does, not everything in there has an English translation. I bought it through the website.

Just finished DEADPOOL: WADE WILSON'S WAR which was really cool. Great art.

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RAGING BULL II: THE CONTINUING STORY OF JAKE LA MOTTA. This was a pretty good sequel about the later years of La Motta's life. While he is retired from boxing, everyone around him refers to him as Champ and the book delved into La Motta's four marriages after his famous marriage to Vickie and his continued undying love for her even though he re-married a bunch of times. The book also delved into the friendship between Jake and his childhood friend Rick (who was really Peter Savage) and how they tried to make RAGING BULL into a movie and his meetings with Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese. Pretty good book...they are making the movie version under a new title (due to copyright by MGM) with William Forsythe playing Jake.

BATMAN: THE KILLING JOKE and THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS - excellent graphic novels surrounding around Batman!

ESSENTIAL CAPTAIN AMERICA VOL. 1 - great collection of Tales of Suspense stories revolving around Cap from Stan Lee and (most of them) Jack Kirby!

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I read Joe Hill's Horns recently and it was excellent. I was already a Joe Hill fan (his comic series Locke & Key is stunning and an excellent gateway for non-comic readers) so when I heard they were adapting his novel Horns into a movie I decided to check it out. Definitely worth it!

My in-the-background project piece has been Game of Thrones lately. It's slow going since I only read it on the subway and it's long, but it is of course excellent. I think I'll have an easier time getting through the series once I'm passed the first one since the first season of the HBO show so closely follows the book that there is very little difference.

Lastly I've also been making my through Bill Willingham's ongoing comic series Fables and loving every second of it. It's very accessible, but also intelligent and contains nice art. I'm through issue 70 now and have yet to be disappointed.

I've read some other things lately that I haven't enjoyed as much, but I certainly won't waste your time with that :tongue:

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Just got through reading Psycho(1959, Author: Robert Bloch), and I am about half-way through Stephen King's The Shining(1977, Author: Stephen King).

Pyscho was pretty good. Always been a fan of the movies, so it was great to finally read the book. It was a lot creeper than the movie(expecially Norman Bates).

The Shining, so far, is much better than the film version(which I also like). I feel that it explains things much better and is actually a lot more interesting a story.

:nerd:

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