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Is it me, or does Bill Wallaces character, look like a ninja?, wearing the hood, in these 1970's variations of the AFOO theatrical poster's.

 

AFO1.jpg

AFO12.jpg

AFO13.jpg

Edited by DragonClaws

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On 12/15/2018 at 12:42 AM, Phantom Dreamer said:

Bob Wall, Chuck Norris, hairstylist turned film producer Andy Vajna, Bruce Lee and Raymond Chow at the Golden Crown Court restaurant in Hong Kong circa 1972. Correcting the record for prosperity's sake.

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'Rambo,' 'Total Recall' producer Andy Vajna dies at 74. Andy Vajna 1944-2019. 

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By the time he had completed his master’s degree in 1968, Shin had been instructing students in Tang Soo Do throughout South Korea for almost 20 years. That same year at the request and sponsorship of Chuck Norris, Shin came to the United States[5] to continue graduate studies at Rutgers University and extend his instruction to foreign students as a representative for the Korean Soo Bahk Do Association.[3][6]

Link- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_Jae-chul

 

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On 4/24/2019 at 10:26 PM, DragonClaws said:

 

 

Great post,would love to see the dailies.I think in a real fight Chuck would have stomped the snott out of Carridine.👍👍👍

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Mr. Norris has good reason to be happy. Like another strong, silent type before him, Clint Eastwood, Mr. Norris has been belatedly ''discovered'' by audiences and critics alike after a nine-year career in which his films were routinely lambasted and he was written off as a wooden actor whose only talents were his high kicks and lethal karate chops. He was, to some critics, ''the blond Bruce Lee.''

The keys to the 45-year-old actor's newfound success are two recent movies in which he got to do more -at least a little bit more - than just kick, chop, knife, shoot and bomb his enemies into submission. The first was ''Missing in Action,'' in which he played an American Army colonel, who, after years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, returns there to try to rescue other prisoners. The second was ''Code of Silence,''

 

CHUCK NORRIS -- STRONG, SILENT AND POPULAR  By JUDY KLEMESRUD SEPT. 1, 1985

Link- https://www.nytimes.com/1985/09/01/arts/chuck-norris-strong-silent-and-popular.html

 

Chuck Norris plays high-kicking cop Eddie Cusack, in a scene from Code of Silence(1985)

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Edited by DragonClaws

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The last classic Chuck Norris movie?.

 

 

 

 

Awsome advert for Braddock M.I.A Sport'swear, how much are these now going for on Ebay?.

 

 

 

 

"Rentals will be hotter than hell, when Chuck Norris kick's excitment into overdrive"

 

 

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Much as I hate to say it, I felt disappointed at Chuck Norris in the Octagon.  Specifically what disappointed me was his Swordplay.  Seems that Norris is much better suited for Karate.  That's why I preferred Norris in the Texas Ranger series where he seems to feel right at home.

On the other hand the Westerner I thought was really good at Swordplay was Mike Stone.  I still have a magazine back issue featuring an interview with Mike Stone where he says that at a certain point the Sword itself seems to take on a life of its own.  Interestingly this happens to be the case with some Sword-practitioners who say that the blade develops a "soul" of its own.  That's why some characters such as Nemuri Kyoshiro actually give a name to their Sword.

Edited by Shosetsu

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On 6/14/2019 at 1:44 AM, Shosetsu said:

Much as I hate to say it, I felt disappointed at Chuck Norris in the Octagon.  Specifically what disappointed me was his Swordplay.  Seems that Norris is much better suited for Karate.  That's why I preferred Norris in the Texas Ranger series where he seems to feel right at home.

 

I didnt pick up on this, my knowledge of swordplay skills being limited. Sure it mpressed 1970 cinema goers in the U.S, the one's who didnt spend hours watching Hong Kong/Japanese movies.

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On 6/27/2019 at 9:08 AM, DragonClaws said:

 

I didnt pick up on this, my knowledge of swordplay skills being limited. Sure it mpressed 1970 cinema goers in the U.S, the one's who didnt spend hours watching Hong Kong/Japanese movies.

Your point is well-taken, DC.  Yes, you're right--it's because I had already seen so many Japanese films before I saw Octagon so that I became very discriminating/sensitive as to good Swordplay.  Octagon was Ninjutsu but it was a Westernized version,  so it rubbed me the wrong way.  Even Sho Kosugi's films were Westernized in a way too, but Kosugi at least injected some degree of authenticity to his swordplay.  

Edited by Shosetsu

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