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Super Ninja

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About Super Ninja

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  1. I liked it the first time, but after rewatching Chocolate, the action in RP just didn't work for me the next time. I liked the idea of Muay Thai combined with drunken boxing and breakdance moves, really creative choreography but the fights lacked impact. You are right about that Yanin - Jindasing fight, there are some brutal moments, but compared with the real bone-crunching ma action Thailand spoiled us with, RP is just not on the same level.
  2. Didn't know Jeeja joined the cast, that's great news. I'm still waiting for her to deliver something on Chocolate level.
  3. I gave Pete Walker a chance some time ago, but lost my interest after two movies. Frightmare was one of them and it was ok, nothing more. House of Whipcord (1974), Walker's take on the WIP genre, was slightly better, but nothing that would impress me enough to check out more of his stuff.
  4. Super Ninja

    Quentin Tarantino's Top 20 favorite Spaghetti Westerns

    The first ten is quite up to my taste with the exception of Django, I really love Corbucci's work but that one was probably the least satisfying for me. It is the bottom half that I never could quite agree with. Films like Tepepa, Viva Django, Dirty Outlaws or The Ugly Ones never had it for me, even such classic as The Big Gundown, widely regarded as one of the very best. Instead, my favs include Mannaja, Sabata, Bandidos or even somewhat strange picks like Ballata Per Un Pistolero and A Man Called Sledge.
  5. Super Ninja

    Lethal Ninja (1992)

    Think you got the wrong a.k.a. For Hire is the original title of the 1991. ninja movie with David Heavener, it is also known under the title Lethal Ninja. I should know, I watched it thinking it was this movie, and it is even worse. The 1992. LN is also known under the title American Ninja 5: The Nostradamus Syndrome. Besides these two, there's another ninja movie with the same title, it was directed by Herman Yau in 2006. and it's hardly worth the watch. As for the ninja roller skating scene, I loved it, but the one from Ninja Thunderbolt is definitely better. btw from the info I have, Joseph Wein is a Polish director and this was his first movie. He lived in South Africa for some time, so that's how the country got its, I believe, first and only ninja movie. Supposedly, Wein is a philosopher and historian, I don't know what in the hell made him direct a ninja movie, but I'm glad he did.
  6. Super Ninja

    Kill 'Em All (2012)

    Too late, I watched it already It is Huber's worst definitely. I did like Tang's fight with the Trio though, mostly because of Karanja Yorke, he's throwing in bits of both dragon and snake style, and if I'm not mistaken even some drunken boxing, but it's all too short and too much of a mess though. Tang's fight with Achabbakhe and Anton Kalinitchenko, the Russian assassins, is by far the best and the only thing worth seeing here. Well, at least something.
  7. Super Ninja

    Kill 'Em All (2012)

    Personally, I found Kill 'em All to be a slight progress for Huber's first feature when it comes to characters and plot which is more serious and more intriguing. However, the most important thing, the action, was a step back. I don't blame Tim Man, from what I could tell, he did a good job. It's editing that sucks. I don't think I've ever watched ma movie with choreography that's been edited so horribly, a cut after almost every move! Tim Man has a right to be mad, but if it's true that the editor was American guy, that explains a lot. I was disappointed, not so much because I didn't like the movie, I'll watch anything as long as there's some ma on display, but because it's a shame all that potential was wasted. Huber got the chance to work with legends like Gordon Liu and Joe Lewis, that's like a dream come true for any aspiring ma filmmaker, he had Tim Man to do the fight choreography, he had guys like Erik Markus Sch├╝tz or Brahim Achabbakhe who was good in The Sanctuary, and the talented Zom Ammara, hell, even Toby Russell was involved as first assistant director, that could have meant something. But instead of delivering something in the line of Bangkok Adrenaline, only better, he just made a mess. Well, the editor did to say the truth. I do hope Dragonwolf is better.
  8. Funny, Bangkok Adrenaline was the last for me, I'm into Thai martial arts now, watching stuff that I've missed before. It was discussed a lot here, and I'm one of those who really enjoyed the movie, despite the fact that other than action, everything else is awful. Tonight I'll be watching Kill 'em All, I understand it's not as good, but I'm gonna check it out anyway.
  9. Super Ninja

    The Fate of the Furious (2017)

    It's dumb fun, that's how I describe it. As pretty much most of the Hollywood movies are nowadays, XXX 3 being probably the latest and best example. Lately when watching those kind of movies, usually one part of me really enjoys (I did enjoy watching Furious 7 quite a lot) while the other part finds hard to ignore how painfully dumb it gets. But, when I'm in need of some, as you say it, undemanding entertainment, I can't think of anything better.
  10. Super Ninja

    John Carpenter: Escape From N.Y Theme Live In The Studio(2016)

    Yeah, I missed his live performance at last year's edition of Neuchatel International Fantastic Film Festival, this just reminded me of my fail. Here's a photo from the concert:
  11. Super Ninja

    The Fate of the Furious (2017)

    They should've stopped after Fast Five.
  12. That's all true, but I can handle awful comedy and already seen plots, it's something you kinda have to get used to with those cheap ones. Back then when I watched the movie I was pretty much addicted to fu films, I needed my daily dose so anything was good to me. I wouldn't call it anything more than average at best, but that Shaking Eagle villain really stayed with me, and I find his dubbed voice to be even more annoying than those bird flapping sound effects.
  13. I can't quite agree with you, I found 18 Fatal Strikes to be an amusing fu flick, and Shaking Eagle one of the more interesting and memorable white-haired villains. I'm not a fan of Sze Ma-Lung, but I liked him in this role. The movie is also part of Wu Tang Iron Fist collection.
  14. Alien vs. Ninja is crazy enough to be well worth of your time. Sushi Typhoon is a synonym for cheap, bloody and fun with insane ideas that are enough for three movies. Since you already entered gorefest waters with Machine Girl which is pretty good, ST has a couple that should not be missed: Helldriver (2011) from the director of equally brilliant Tokyo Gore Police (2008) Yoshihiro Nishimura, and Yakuza Weapon (2011) written and directed by Yudai Yamaguchi and Tak Sakaguchi. Great stuff!
  15. There are some great Japanese movies mentioned in here. If I could make a suggestion, being that you're into anime at the moment, I'm sure you know about Akira (1988) anime masterpiece made by Katsuhiro Otomo, but what I'd really like to recommend is The End Of Evangelion (1997) by Hideaki Anno. There is a series which to be honest I didn't watch, but there are also two anime movies, first being quite hard to digest on account of the editing, it's just bits of the series compiled into a movie, but The End of Evangelion is not only the greatest anime movie I've seen, but also the most powerful anime experience of my life. Some of my other favorite include X (Rintaro, 1996), The Place Promised in Our Early Days (Makoto Shinkai, 2004), and Tales from Earthsea (2006) by Miyazaki's son Goro. As for movies, I'd recommend: Visitor Q (Takashi Miike, 2001) Kuroneko (Kaneto Shindo, 1968) Mission: Iron Castle (Kazuo Mori, 1970) - if you like B&W shinobi movies Go, Go Second Time Virgin (Koji Wakamatsu, 1969) School of the Holy Beast (Norifumi Suzuki, 1974) Boxer (Shuji Terayama, 1977) - or anything else he made Branded to Kill (Seijun Suzuki, 1967) @Takuma made a great list with some of my favorites: Blue Spring, Sonatine, Street Fighter, Suicide Club, A Scene at the Sea, Eureka, Tokyo Drifter, Audition and of course Love Exposure, one of the greatest movies ever! btw that book of yours about martial arts styles in movies looks like something I need to get asap.
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